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Title: Highly Sensitive Gamma-Spectrometers of Gerda for Material Screening: Part 2

Abstract

The previous article about material screening for Gerda points out the importance of strict material screening and selection for radioimpurities as a key to meet the aspired background levels of the Gerda experiment. This is directly done using low-level gammaspectroscopy. In order to provide sufficient selective power in the mBq/kg range and below, the employed gamma-spectrometers themselves have to meet strict material requirements, and make use of an elaborate shielding system. This article gives an account of the setup of two such spectrometers. Corrado is located in a depth of 15 m w.e. at the MPI-K in Heidelberg (Germany), Gempi III is situated at the Gran-Sasso underground laboratory at 3500 m w.e. (Italy). The latter one aims at detecting sample activities of the order ~10 μBq/kg, which is the current state-of-the-art level. The applied techniques to meet the respective needs are discussed and demonstrated by experimental results.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
960320
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-57611
NN2003000; TRN: US200923%%393
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the XIV International Baksan School "Particles and Cosmology" 16-21 April 2007, Baksan Valley, Russian Federation, 233-238
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; COSMOLOGY; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; GAMMA SPECTROMETERS; GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY; SHIELDING; SPECTROMETERS; optional gamma spectroscopy; ultra-low background; underground

Citation Formats

Budjas, Dusan, Hampel, W., Heisel, M., Heusser, G., Keillor, Marty, Laubenstein, M., Maneschg, W., Rugel, G., Schonert, S., Simgen, H., and Strecker, H. Highly Sensitive Gamma-Spectrometers of Gerda for Material Screening: Part 2. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Budjas, Dusan, Hampel, W., Heisel, M., Heusser, G., Keillor, Marty, Laubenstein, M., Maneschg, W., Rugel, G., Schonert, S., Simgen, H., & Strecker, H. Highly Sensitive Gamma-Spectrometers of Gerda for Material Screening: Part 2. United States.
Budjas, Dusan, Hampel, W., Heisel, M., Heusser, G., Keillor, Marty, Laubenstein, M., Maneschg, W., Rugel, G., Schonert, S., Simgen, H., and Strecker, H. Sat . "Highly Sensitive Gamma-Spectrometers of Gerda for Material Screening: Part 2". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_960320,
title = {Highly Sensitive Gamma-Spectrometers of Gerda for Material Screening: Part 2},
author = {Budjas, Dusan and Hampel, W. and Heisel, M. and Heusser, G. and Keillor, Marty and Laubenstein, M. and Maneschg, W. and Rugel, G. and Schonert, S. and Simgen, H. and Strecker, H.},
abstractNote = {The previous article about material screening for Gerda points out the importance of strict material screening and selection for radioimpurities as a key to meet the aspired background levels of the Gerda experiment. This is directly done using low-level gammaspectroscopy. In order to provide sufficient selective power in the mBq/kg range and below, the employed gamma-spectrometers themselves have to meet strict material requirements, and make use of an elaborate shielding system. This article gives an account of the setup of two such spectrometers. Corrado is located in a depth of 15 m w.e. at the MPI-K in Heidelberg (Germany), Gempi III is situated at the Gran-Sasso underground laboratory at 3500 m w.e. (Italy). The latter one aims at detecting sample activities of the order ~10 μBq/kg, which is the current state-of-the-art level. The applied techniques to meet the respective needs are discussed and demonstrated by experimental results.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sat Apr 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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