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Title: Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration

Abstract

Interactions between plants and microbes are an integral part of our terrestrial ecosystem. Microbe-plant interactions are being applied in many areas. In this review, we present recent reports of applications in the areas of plant-growth promotion, biocontrol, bioactive compound and biomaterial production, remediation and carbon sequestration. Challenges, limitations and future outlook for each field are discussed.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Earth Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
960238
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1658E
TRN: US200924%%276
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Microbial Biotechnology; Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; 58; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; DISEASES; PLANT GROWTH; PRODUCTION; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Wu, C.H., Bernard, S., Andersen, G.L., and Chen, W. Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1751-7915.2009.00109.x.
Wu, C.H., Bernard, S., Andersen, G.L., & Chen, W. Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1751-7915.2009.00109.x.
Wu, C.H., Bernard, S., Andersen, G.L., and Chen, W. Sun . "Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1751-7915.2009.00109.x. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/960238.
@article{osti_960238,
title = {Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration},
author = {Wu, C.H. and Bernard, S. and Andersen, G.L. and Chen, W.},
abstractNote = {Interactions between plants and microbes are an integral part of our terrestrial ecosystem. Microbe-plant interactions are being applied in many areas. In this review, we present recent reports of applications in the areas of plant-growth promotion, biocontrol, bioactive compound and biomaterial production, remediation and carbon sequestration. Challenges, limitations and future outlook for each field are discussed.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1751-7915.2009.00109.x},
journal = {Microbial Biotechnology},
number = 4,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2009},
month = {Sun Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2009}
}
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