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Title: Self-Organized Growth of Microsized Ge Wires on Si (111) Surfaces

Abstract

Microsized Ge wires can appear spontaneously when grown on a vicinal Si (111) surface miscut by 4 along the [11-2] direction by using molecular-beam epitaxy. Time-resolved in situ grazing incidence small-angle scattering of x rays, atomic force microscopy, and micro-Raman scattering show that the formation of Ge microwires is due to coalescence of islands along the step edges and ripening of the structures accompanied by a partial consumption of the wetting layer.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
960009
Report Number(s):
BNL-82995-2009-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0163-1829; PRBMDO; TRN: US1005866
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics; Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 23
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; COALESCENCE; EPITAXY; ISLANDS; RIPENING; SCATTERING; SURFACES; WIRES; GERMANIUM; MICROSTRUCTURE; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Xu,Z., Zhang, Y., Headrick, R., Zhou, H., Zhou, L., and Fukamachi, T.. Self-Organized Growth of Microsized Ge Wires on Si (111) Surfaces. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.75.233310.
Xu,Z., Zhang, Y., Headrick, R., Zhou, H., Zhou, L., & Fukamachi, T.. Self-Organized Growth of Microsized Ge Wires on Si (111) Surfaces. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.75.233310.
Xu,Z., Zhang, Y., Headrick, R., Zhou, H., Zhou, L., and Fukamachi, T.. 2007. "Self-Organized Growth of Microsized Ge Wires on Si (111) Surfaces". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.75.233310.
@article{osti_960009,
title = {Self-Organized Growth of Microsized Ge Wires on Si (111) Surfaces},
author = {Xu,Z. and Zhang, Y. and Headrick, R. and Zhou, H. and Zhou, L. and Fukamachi, T.},
abstractNote = {Microsized Ge wires can appear spontaneously when grown on a vicinal Si (111) surface miscut by 4 along the [11-2] direction by using molecular-beam epitaxy. Time-resolved in situ grazing incidence small-angle scattering of x rays, atomic force microscopy, and micro-Raman scattering show that the formation of Ge microwires is due to coalescence of islands along the step edges and ripening of the structures accompanied by a partial consumption of the wetting layer.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.75.233310},
journal = {Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics},
number = 23,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 1
}
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