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Title: Antifouling Block Copolymer Surfaces that Resist Settlement of Barnacle Larvae

Abstract

Marine biofouling is a serious problem caused by the accumulation and settlement of barnacles, macroalgae, and microbial slimes on the hulls of seafaring vessels. Biofouling can significantly increase drag, leading to startling consequences with regards to fuel consumption. Environmentally compatible solutions to biofouling are being sought as traditional metal-based systems of fouling control are being phased out due to their inherent toxicity. Further exasperating the problem of biofouling is the vast range of fouling organisms and environmental conditions experienced throughout the world. This renders the development of a universal biofouling coating a significant challenge.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
959955
Report Number(s):
BNL-82941-2009-JA
TRN: US201016%%1099
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering; Journal Volume: 96
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BIOLOGICAL FOULING; COATINGS; COPOLYMERS; FOULING; FUEL CONSUMPTION; LARVAE; TOXICITY; SHIPS; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Weinman,C., Krishnan, S., Park, D., Paik, M., Wong, K., Fischer, D., Handlin, D., Kowalke, G., Wendt, D., and et al. Antifouling Block Copolymer Surfaces that Resist Settlement of Barnacle Larvae. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Weinman,C., Krishnan, S., Park, D., Paik, M., Wong, K., Fischer, D., Handlin, D., Kowalke, G., Wendt, D., & et al. Antifouling Block Copolymer Surfaces that Resist Settlement of Barnacle Larvae. United States.
Weinman,C., Krishnan, S., Park, D., Paik, M., Wong, K., Fischer, D., Handlin, D., Kowalke, G., Wendt, D., and et al. Mon . "Antifouling Block Copolymer Surfaces that Resist Settlement of Barnacle Larvae". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_959955,
title = {Antifouling Block Copolymer Surfaces that Resist Settlement of Barnacle Larvae},
author = {Weinman,C. and Krishnan, S. and Park, D. and Paik, M. and Wong, K. and Fischer, D. and Handlin, D. and Kowalke, G. and Wendt, D. and et al},
abstractNote = {Marine biofouling is a serious problem caused by the accumulation and settlement of barnacles, macroalgae, and microbial slimes on the hulls of seafaring vessels. Biofouling can significantly increase drag, leading to startling consequences with regards to fuel consumption. Environmentally compatible solutions to biofouling are being sought as traditional metal-based systems of fouling control are being phased out due to their inherent toxicity. Further exasperating the problem of biofouling is the vast range of fouling organisms and environmental conditions experienced throughout the world. This renders the development of a universal biofouling coating a significant challenge.},
doi = {},
journal = {Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering},
number = ,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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