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Title: Tackling Climate Change in the U.S.: The Potential for Greenhouse Gas Reductions in the Buildings Sector

Abstract

This paper is based largely on a report published by the Pew Center on Global Climate Change that describes the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions from the buildings sector [1]. Assuming vigorous encouragement from market-transforming policies and successful R&D, it concludes that green products, technologies, and practices could reduce emissions from buildings by almost one quarter by the year 2025, or by an amount roughly equal to 10% of total projected U.S. carbon emissions.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
958768
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Solar 2006, Denver, CO, USA, 20060707, 20060713
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BUILDINGS; CARBON; CLIMATIC CHANGE; GREENHOUSE GASES; MITIGATION

Citation Formats

Brown, Marilyn A, Stovall, Therese K, and Hughes, Patrick M. Tackling Climate Change in the U.S.: The Potential for Greenhouse Gas Reductions in the Buildings Sector. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Brown, Marilyn A, Stovall, Therese K, & Hughes, Patrick M. Tackling Climate Change in the U.S.: The Potential for Greenhouse Gas Reductions in the Buildings Sector. United States.
Brown, Marilyn A, Stovall, Therese K, and Hughes, Patrick M. Mon . "Tackling Climate Change in the U.S.: The Potential for Greenhouse Gas Reductions in the Buildings Sector". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_958768,
title = {Tackling Climate Change in the U.S.: The Potential for Greenhouse Gas Reductions in the Buildings Sector},
author = {Brown, Marilyn A and Stovall, Therese K and Hughes, Patrick M},
abstractNote = {This paper is based largely on a report published by the Pew Center on Global Climate Change that describes the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions from the buildings sector [1]. Assuming vigorous encouragement from market-transforming policies and successful R&D, it concludes that green products, technologies, and practices could reduce emissions from buildings by almost one quarter by the year 2025, or by an amount roughly equal to 10% of total projected U.S. carbon emissions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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