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Title: Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients alter competitive performance of California annual grassland species

Abstract

Atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients altered interspecific competitive performance of three grassland annuals, all exhibiting the C{sub 3} metabolic pathway. Plantago erecta, an herbaceous dicot dominant in low-fertility serpentine grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at low soil nutrients. Bromus hordeaceus, an introduced grass dominant in higher fertility sandstone grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Plantago was slightly enhanced under elevated CO{sub 2}, but only at high soil nutrients, whereas interspecific competitive ability of Bromus was stimulated under elevated CO{sub 2} at both low and high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Lasthenia californica, another herbaceous dicot common in serpentine grassland, was low in all treatments, and tended to decrease with elevated CO{sub 2} at low soil nutrients. Our results suggest that elevated CO{sub 2} may shift plant species abundance of serpentine grassland in favor of Bromus hordeaceus.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Carnegie Institute of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
95873
Report Number(s):
CONF-9507129-
Journal ID: BECLAG; ISSN 0012-9623; TRN: 95:004728-0140
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America; Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: 80. anniversary of the transdisciplinary nature of ecology, Snowbird, UT (United States), 30 Jul - 3 Aug 1995; Other Information: PBD: Jun 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CARBON DIOXIDE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; GRAMINEAE; POPULATION DYNAMICS; RANGELANDS; SERPENTINE

Citation Formats

Reynolds, H.L., Chapin, F.S. III, and Field, C.B. Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients alter competitive performance of California annual grassland species. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Reynolds, H.L., Chapin, F.S. III, & Field, C.B. Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients alter competitive performance of California annual grassland species. United States.
Reynolds, H.L., Chapin, F.S. III, and Field, C.B. Thu . "Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients alter competitive performance of California annual grassland species". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_95873,
title = {Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients alter competitive performance of California annual grassland species},
author = {Reynolds, H.L. and Chapin, F.S. III and Field, C.B.},
abstractNote = {Atmospheric CO{sub 2} and soil nutrients altered interspecific competitive performance of three grassland annuals, all exhibiting the C{sub 3} metabolic pathway. Plantago erecta, an herbaceous dicot dominant in low-fertility serpentine grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at low soil nutrients. Bromus hordeaceus, an introduced grass dominant in higher fertility sandstone grassland, was the superior interspecific competitor at high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Plantago was slightly enhanced under elevated CO{sub 2}, but only at high soil nutrients, whereas interspecific competitive ability of Bromus was stimulated under elevated CO{sub 2} at both low and high soil nutrients. Interspecific competitive ability of Lasthenia californica, another herbaceous dicot common in serpentine grassland, was low in all treatments, and tended to decrease with elevated CO{sub 2} at low soil nutrients. Our results suggest that elevated CO{sub 2} may shift plant species abundance of serpentine grassland in favor of Bromus hordeaceus.},
doi = {},
journal = {Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America},
number = 2,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}
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