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Title: Large-scale estimates of the patterns of and controls on CO{sub 2} flux in arctic Alaska in relation to global change

Abstract

Recent warming and drying in the arctic has resulted in a change from CO{sub 2} sink to CO{sub 2} source with respect to the atmosphere. The large stores of soil carbon of perhaps up to 177 PgC, and its sensitivity changes in soil temperature and soil moisture, mean that strong positive feedbacks on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and climate change are possible and make understanding the patterns of and controls on CO{sub 2} flux important. However, the large spatial variability in arctic tundra composition and trace gas fluxes make large-scale estimations challenging. We are using a combinations of rapid cuvette, tower-based eddy correlation, and aircraft-based eddy correlation measurements to estimate regional CO{sub 2} fluxes. Recent measurements indicate good agreement between chamber, tower-based measurements, and that most tundra sites are a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Site specific changes in CO{sub 2} flux have been demonstrated. US IBP site 2, at Barrow, Alaska, was found to be a strong sink of CO{sub 2} of 25 g m{sup -2} y{sup -1} in the early 1970s, and is now seen to be a source of CO{sup 2} to the atmosphere of about 1.3 g C m{sup -2} y{sup -1}. A decrease inmore » soil moisture content or water table has a greater effect on CO{sub 2} loss than does an increase in temperature. Methods of predicting fluxes from remotely sensed imagery and surface characteristics are being explored.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. San Diego State Univ., CA (United States)|[NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
95861
Report Number(s):
CONF-9507129-
Journal ID: BECLAG; ISSN 0012-9623; TRN: 95:004728-0128
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America; Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: 80. anniversary of the transdisciplinary nature of ecology, Snowbird, UT (United States), 30 Jul - 3 Aug 1995; Other Information: PBD: Jun 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; GLOBAL ASPECTS; CARBON DIOXIDE; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ARCTIC REGIONS; CARBON CYCLE; SOIL CHEMISTRY; SOILS

Citation Formats

Oechel, W.C., Vourlitis, G., and Crawford, T. Large-scale estimates of the patterns of and controls on CO{sub 2} flux in arctic Alaska in relation to global change. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Oechel, W.C., Vourlitis, G., & Crawford, T. Large-scale estimates of the patterns of and controls on CO{sub 2} flux in arctic Alaska in relation to global change. United States.
Oechel, W.C., Vourlitis, G., and Crawford, T. Thu . "Large-scale estimates of the patterns of and controls on CO{sub 2} flux in arctic Alaska in relation to global change". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_95861,
title = {Large-scale estimates of the patterns of and controls on CO{sub 2} flux in arctic Alaska in relation to global change},
author = {Oechel, W.C. and Vourlitis, G. and Crawford, T.},
abstractNote = {Recent warming and drying in the arctic has resulted in a change from CO{sub 2} sink to CO{sub 2} source with respect to the atmosphere. The large stores of soil carbon of perhaps up to 177 PgC, and its sensitivity changes in soil temperature and soil moisture, mean that strong positive feedbacks on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and climate change are possible and make understanding the patterns of and controls on CO{sub 2} flux important. However, the large spatial variability in arctic tundra composition and trace gas fluxes make large-scale estimations challenging. We are using a combinations of rapid cuvette, tower-based eddy correlation, and aircraft-based eddy correlation measurements to estimate regional CO{sub 2} fluxes. Recent measurements indicate good agreement between chamber, tower-based measurements, and that most tundra sites are a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Site specific changes in CO{sub 2} flux have been demonstrated. US IBP site 2, at Barrow, Alaska, was found to be a strong sink of CO{sub 2} of 25 g m{sup -2} y{sup -1} in the early 1970s, and is now seen to be a source of CO{sup 2} to the atmosphere of about 1.3 g C m{sup -2} y{sup -1}. A decrease in soil moisture content or water table has a greater effect on CO{sub 2} loss than does an increase in temperature. Methods of predicting fluxes from remotely sensed imagery and surface characteristics are being explored.},
doi = {},
journal = {Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America},
number = 2,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}