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Title: Acclimation of plant species to elevated CO{sub 2}

Abstract

Plant species differ in assimilated carbon partitioning between starch, sucrose and hexose sugars. Soluble sugars have been implicated to play a role in downregulating rubisco and other photosynthesis enzymes on the level of transcription. In this study we compared high CO{sub 2} response of plants with different physiology. Cucumber, tobacco and sunflower were chosen as relatively good starch accumulators, spinach and sugar-beet as species with high leaf soluble sugar levels. In addition woody species cottonwood and salt cedar and one C{sub 4} species (corn) were studied. Plants were grown from seed at three CO{sub 2} levels: 330 {mu}bar, 660 {mu}bar and 1500 {mu}bar. Two soil nitrogen levels were used: one that allowed normal growth and the other that caused about 5 times growth suppression. All species except corn (C{sub 4}) showed downregulation of leaf rubisco activity. This downregulation was due to decrease of rubisco content, activation state remaining unchanged. Initial slope of AC{sub i} curve and rubisco activity were in good correlation. Low and high nitrogen plants had similar relative changes in photosynthetic activity. Final harvest onground weight correlated with CO{sub 2} uptake at growth conditions. We concluded that soluble sugars per se do not cause downregulation of leaf photosyntheticmore » activity at high CO{sub 2}.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)
  2. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
95825
Report Number(s):
CONF-9507129-
Journal ID: BECLAG; ISSN 0012-9623; TRN: 95:004728-0090
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 76; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: 80. anniversary of the transdisciplinary nature of ecology, Snowbird, UT (United States), 30 Jul - 3 Aug 1995; Other Information: PBD: Jun 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; PLANTS; BIOLOGICAL ADAPTATION; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; NITROGEN

Citation Formats

Olavi, K, Ball, J T, and Seemann, J. Acclimation of plant species to elevated CO{sub 2}. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Olavi, K, Ball, J T, & Seemann, J. Acclimation of plant species to elevated CO{sub 2}. United States.
Olavi, K, Ball, J T, and Seemann, J. Thu . "Acclimation of plant species to elevated CO{sub 2}". United States.
@article{osti_95825,
title = {Acclimation of plant species to elevated CO{sub 2}},
author = {Olavi, K and Ball, J T and Seemann, J},
abstractNote = {Plant species differ in assimilated carbon partitioning between starch, sucrose and hexose sugars. Soluble sugars have been implicated to play a role in downregulating rubisco and other photosynthesis enzymes on the level of transcription. In this study we compared high CO{sub 2} response of plants with different physiology. Cucumber, tobacco and sunflower were chosen as relatively good starch accumulators, spinach and sugar-beet as species with high leaf soluble sugar levels. In addition woody species cottonwood and salt cedar and one C{sub 4} species (corn) were studied. Plants were grown from seed at three CO{sub 2} levels: 330 {mu}bar, 660 {mu}bar and 1500 {mu}bar. Two soil nitrogen levels were used: one that allowed normal growth and the other that caused about 5 times growth suppression. All species except corn (C{sub 4}) showed downregulation of leaf rubisco activity. This downregulation was due to decrease of rubisco content, activation state remaining unchanged. Initial slope of AC{sub i} curve and rubisco activity were in good correlation. Low and high nitrogen plants had similar relative changes in photosynthetic activity. Final harvest onground weight correlated with CO{sub 2} uptake at growth conditions. We concluded that soluble sugars per se do not cause downregulation of leaf photosynthetic activity at high CO{sub 2}.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/95825}, journal = {Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America},
number = 2,
volume = 76,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {6}
}