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Title: Spore Coat Architecture of Clostridium novyi-NT spores

Abstract

Spores of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium novyi-NT are able to germinate in and destroy hypoxic regions of tumors in experimental animals. Future progress in this area will benefit from a better understanding of the germination and outgrowth processes that are essential for the tumorilytic properties of these spores. Towards this end, we have used both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to determine the structure of dormant as well as germinating spores. We found that the spores are surrounded by an amorphous layer intertwined with honeycomb parasporal layers. Moreover, the spore coat layers had apparently self-assembled and this assembly was likely to be governed by crystal growth principles. During germination and outgrowth, the honeycomb layers as well as the underlying spore coat and undercoat layers sequentially dissolved until the vegetative cell was released. In addition to their implications for understanding the biology of C. novyi-NT, these studies document the presence of proteinaceous growth spirals in a biological organism.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
957610
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-230805
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9193; JOBAAY; TRN: US201016%%55
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 189, no. 17, September 5, 2007, pp. 6457-6468; Journal Volume: 189; Journal Issue: 17
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ANIMALS; ARCHITECTURE; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; BIOLOGY; CLOSTRIDIUM; CRYSTAL GROWTH; GERMINATION; NEOPLASMS; SPORES; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Plomp, M, McCafferey, J, Cheong, I, Huang, X, Bettegowda, C, Kinzler, K, Zhou, S, Vogelstein, B, and Malkin, A. Spore Coat Architecture of Clostridium novyi-NT spores. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1128/JB.00757-07.
Plomp, M, McCafferey, J, Cheong, I, Huang, X, Bettegowda, C, Kinzler, K, Zhou, S, Vogelstein, B, & Malkin, A. Spore Coat Architecture of Clostridium novyi-NT spores. United States. doi:10.1128/JB.00757-07.
Plomp, M, McCafferey, J, Cheong, I, Huang, X, Bettegowda, C, Kinzler, K, Zhou, S, Vogelstein, B, and Malkin, A. Mon . "Spore Coat Architecture of Clostridium novyi-NT spores". United States. doi:10.1128/JB.00757-07. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/957610.
@article{osti_957610,
title = {Spore Coat Architecture of Clostridium novyi-NT spores},
author = {Plomp, M and McCafferey, J and Cheong, I and Huang, X and Bettegowda, C and Kinzler, K and Zhou, S and Vogelstein, B and Malkin, A},
abstractNote = {Spores of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium novyi-NT are able to germinate in and destroy hypoxic regions of tumors in experimental animals. Future progress in this area will benefit from a better understanding of the germination and outgrowth processes that are essential for the tumorilytic properties of these spores. Towards this end, we have used both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to determine the structure of dormant as well as germinating spores. We found that the spores are surrounded by an amorphous layer intertwined with honeycomb parasporal layers. Moreover, the spore coat layers had apparently self-assembled and this assembly was likely to be governed by crystal growth principles. During germination and outgrowth, the honeycomb layers as well as the underlying spore coat and undercoat layers sequentially dissolved until the vegetative cell was released. In addition to their implications for understanding the biology of C. novyi-NT, these studies document the presence of proteinaceous growth spirals in a biological organism.},
doi = {10.1128/JB.00757-07},
journal = {Journal of Bacteriology, vol. 189, no. 17, September 5, 2007, pp. 6457-6468},
number = 17,
volume = 189,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon May 07 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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