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Title: Power Systems Advanced Research

Abstract

In the 17 quarters of the project, we have accomplished the following milestones - first, construction of the three multiwavelength laser scattering machines for different light scattering study purposes; second, build up of simulation software package for simulation of field and laboratory particulates matters data; third, carried out field online test on exhaust from combustion engines with our laser scatter system. This report gives a summary of the results and achievements during the project's 16 quarters period. During the 16 quarters of this project, we constructed three multiwavelength scattering instruments for PM2.5 particulates. We build up a simulation software package that could automate the simulation of light scattering for different combinations of particulate matters. At the field test site with our partner, Alturdyne, Inc., we collected light scattering data for a small gas turbine engine. We also included the experimental data feedback function to the simulation software to match simulation with real field data. The PM scattering instruments developed in this project involve the development of some core hardware technologies, including fast gated CCD system, accurately triggered Passively Q-Switched diode pumped lasers, and multiwavelength beam combination system. To calibrate the scattering results for liquid samples, we also developed the calibrationmore » system which includes liquid PM generator and size sorting instrument, i.e. MOUDI. In this report, we give the concise summary report on each of these subsystems development results.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Institute Of Technology
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
957505
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-02NT41581
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; CALIBRATION; COMBUSTION; CONSTRUCTION; ENGINES; FEEDBACK; FIELD TESTS; GAS TURBINE ENGINES; LASERS; LIGHT SCATTERING; PARTICULATES; POWER SYSTEMS; SCATTERING; SIMULATION; SORTING

Citation Formats

California Institute of Technology. Power Systems Advanced Research. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/957505.
California Institute of Technology. Power Systems Advanced Research. United States. doi:10.2172/957505.
California Institute of Technology. Sat . "Power Systems Advanced Research". United States. doi:10.2172/957505. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/957505.
@article{osti_957505,
title = {Power Systems Advanced Research},
author = {California Institute of Technology},
abstractNote = {In the 17 quarters of the project, we have accomplished the following milestones - first, construction of the three multiwavelength laser scattering machines for different light scattering study purposes; second, build up of simulation software package for simulation of field and laboratory particulates matters data; third, carried out field online test on exhaust from combustion engines with our laser scatter system. This report gives a summary of the results and achievements during the project's 16 quarters period. During the 16 quarters of this project, we constructed three multiwavelength scattering instruments for PM2.5 particulates. We build up a simulation software package that could automate the simulation of light scattering for different combinations of particulate matters. At the field test site with our partner, Alturdyne, Inc., we collected light scattering data for a small gas turbine engine. We also included the experimental data feedback function to the simulation software to match simulation with real field data. The PM scattering instruments developed in this project involve the development of some core hardware technologies, including fast gated CCD system, accurately triggered Passively Q-Switched diode pumped lasers, and multiwavelength beam combination system. To calibrate the scattering results for liquid samples, we also developed the calibration system which includes liquid PM generator and size sorting instrument, i.e. MOUDI. In this report, we give the concise summary report on each of these subsystems development results.},
doi = {10.2172/957505},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sat Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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