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Title: The next generation of photo-detector for particle astrophysics.

Abstract

We advocate support of research aimed at developing alternatives to the photomultiplier tube for photon detection in large astroparticle experiments such as gamma-ray and neutrino astronomy, and direct dark matter detectors. Specifically, we discuss the development of large area photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers and silicon photomultipliers. Both technologies have the potential to exhibit improved photon detection efficiency compared to existing glass vacuum photomultiplier tubes.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
956926
Report Number(s):
ANL-HEP-TR-09-27
TRN: US1005017
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; DETECTION; EFFICIENCY; GLASS; NEUTRINOS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; PHOTOCATHODES; PHOTOMULTIPLIERS; PHOTONS; PLATES; SILICON; PHOTODETECTORS

Citation Formats

Wagner, R. G., Byrum, K. L., Sanchez, M., Vaniachine, A. V., Siegmund, O., Otte, N.A., Ramberg, E., Hall, J., Buckley, J., High Energy Physics, Univ. of California at Berkeley, FNAL, and Washington Univ.. The next generation of photo-detector for particle astrophysics.. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.2172/956926.
Wagner, R. G., Byrum, K. L., Sanchez, M., Vaniachine, A. V., Siegmund, O., Otte, N.A., Ramberg, E., Hall, J., Buckley, J., High Energy Physics, Univ. of California at Berkeley, FNAL, & Washington Univ.. The next generation of photo-detector for particle astrophysics.. United States. doi:10.2172/956926.
Wagner, R. G., Byrum, K. L., Sanchez, M., Vaniachine, A. V., Siegmund, O., Otte, N.A., Ramberg, E., Hall, J., Buckley, J., High Energy Physics, Univ. of California at Berkeley, FNAL, and Washington Univ.. 2009. "The next generation of photo-detector for particle astrophysics.". United States. doi:10.2172/956926. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/956926.
@article{osti_956926,
title = {The next generation of photo-detector for particle astrophysics.},
author = {Wagner, R. G. and Byrum, K. L. and Sanchez, M. and Vaniachine, A. V. and Siegmund, O. and Otte, N.A. and Ramberg, E. and Hall, J. and Buckley, J. and High Energy Physics and Univ. of California at Berkeley and FNAL and Washington Univ.},
abstractNote = {We advocate support of research aimed at developing alternatives to the photomultiplier tube for photon detection in large astroparticle experiments such as gamma-ray and neutrino astronomy, and direct dark matter detectors. Specifically, we discuss the development of large area photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers and silicon photomultipliers. Both technologies have the potential to exhibit improved photon detection efficiency compared to existing glass vacuum photomultiplier tubes.},
doi = {10.2172/956926},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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  • We advocate support of research aimed at developing alternatives to the photomultiplier tube for photon detection in large astroparticle experiments such as gamma-ray and neutrino astronomy, and direct dark matter detectors. Specifically, we discuss the development of large area photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers and silicon photomultipliers. Both technologies have the potential to exhibit improved photon detection efficiency compared to existing glass vacuum photomultiplier tubes.
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