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Title: Single-spin microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution based on optically detected magnetic resonance

Abstract

Invention of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) initiated a new era of material science and technology characterized by 2-D imaging with atomic resolution and manipulation of individual atoms. However, for further progress in material science, and in particular in structural biology, 3-D imaging with sub-nanometer resolution is very desirable. Currently the most promising technique for 3-D imaging is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), which senses individual electron spins [1,2] with nanoscale resolution and can detect collective magnetization of about 100 nuclear spins [3]. The highest sensitivity demonstrated by MRFM is based on a time modulation technique called the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAAR) which requires a long phase relaxation time T 2 of measured spins, which usually corresponds to rather low temperature. For example, a temperature of 300 mK was used in the case of 3D imaging of the tobacco mosaic virus [3]. This limitation is incompatible with the room-temperature operation needed for the study of biological systems under physiological conditions.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
956352
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-09-00532; LA-UR-09-532
TRN: US201013%%68
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Nature
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Nature
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71; MAGNETIC RESONANCE; MICROSCOPES; RELAXATION TIME; RESOLUTION; TOBACCO MOSAIC VIRUS

Citation Formats

Berman, Gennady P, and Chernobrod, Boris. Single-spin microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution based on optically detected magnetic resonance. United States: N. p., 2009. Web.
Berman, Gennady P, & Chernobrod, Boris. Single-spin microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution based on optically detected magnetic resonance. United States.
Berman, Gennady P, and Chernobrod, Boris. Thu . "Single-spin microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution based on optically detected magnetic resonance". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/956352.
@article{osti_956352,
title = {Single-spin microscope with sub-nanoscale resolution based on optically detected magnetic resonance},
author = {Berman, Gennady P and Chernobrod, Boris},
abstractNote = {Invention of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) initiated a new era of material science and technology characterized by 2-D imaging with atomic resolution and manipulation of individual atoms. However, for further progress in material science, and in particular in structural biology, 3-D imaging with sub-nanometer resolution is very desirable. Currently the most promising technique for 3-D imaging is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), which senses individual electron spins [1,2] with nanoscale resolution and can detect collective magnetization of about 100 nuclear spins [3]. The highest sensitivity demonstrated by MRFM is based on a time modulation technique called the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAAR) which requires a long phase relaxation time T 2 of measured spins, which usually corresponds to rather low temperature. For example, a temperature of 300 mK was used in the case of 3D imaging of the tobacco mosaic virus [3]. This limitation is incompatible with the room-temperature operation needed for the study of biological systems under physiological conditions.},
doi = {},
journal = {Nature},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {1}
}