skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Inspection and Analysis of the Integrated SWPF Melter System After Seven Years

Abstract

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been processing High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) since 1994. Prior to the startup of the DWPF melter, a 1/10th pilot scale melter designated the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) melter was operated continuously for 7 years at 1150 degrees Celsius. The IDMS processed a wide variety of simulated DWPF and Hanford borosilicate waste glasses. The inspection indicated that the 12 inches thick Monofrax K-3 refractory was in good condition but had experienced some thinning at the sides of the melter in the melt zone. The Inconel 690(R) upper electrodes were in excellent condition while the bottom electrodes immersed in the glass pool exhibited approximately 12 percent wear. Glassy deposits remaining in the melter after draining were about approximately 12 inches deep and were composed of 3.2-8.5 wt percent spinel and less than 0.08 wt percent noble metals (Ru as Ru02, Rh, and Pd). Analysis of glassy deposits embedded in the melter flow, e.g. beneath the remaining 12 inches of glass, contained 27-66 wt percent spinel and up to approximately 9 wt percent noble metals.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
9555
Report Number(s):
WSRC-MS-99-00336, Rev. 0
TRN: US0103147
DOE Contract Number:  
AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 101st Annual Meeting of the American Ceramic Society, Indianapolis, IN (US), 04/27/1999--04/28/1999; Other Information: PBD: 5 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CERAMIC MELTERS; PERFORMANCE; BOROSILICATE GLASS; CERAMICS; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; SPINELS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; INCONEL 690; RUTHENIUM OXIDES; RHODIUM; PALLADIUM; DEPOSITS

Citation Formats

Jantzen, C.M. Inspection and Analysis of the Integrated SWPF Melter System After Seven Years. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Jantzen, C.M. Inspection and Analysis of the Integrated SWPF Melter System After Seven Years. United States.
Jantzen, C.M. Thu . "Inspection and Analysis of the Integrated SWPF Melter System After Seven Years". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/9555.
@article{osti_9555,
title = {Inspection and Analysis of the Integrated SWPF Melter System After Seven Years},
author = {Jantzen, C.M.},
abstractNote = {The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been processing High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) since 1994. Prior to the startup of the DWPF melter, a 1/10th pilot scale melter designated the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) melter was operated continuously for 7 years at 1150 degrees Celsius. The IDMS processed a wide variety of simulated DWPF and Hanford borosilicate waste glasses. The inspection indicated that the 12 inches thick Monofrax K-3 refractory was in good condition but had experienced some thinning at the sides of the melter in the melt zone. The Inconel 690(R) upper electrodes were in excellent condition while the bottom electrodes immersed in the glass pool exhibited approximately 12 percent wear. Glassy deposits remaining in the melter after draining were about approximately 12 inches deep and were composed of 3.2-8.5 wt percent spinel and less than 0.08 wt percent noble metals (Ru as Ru02, Rh, and Pd). Analysis of glassy deposits embedded in the melter flow, e.g. beneath the remaining 12 inches of glass, contained 27-66 wt percent spinel and up to approximately 9 wt percent noble metals.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: