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Title: Poly(dimethylsiloxane) thin films as biocompatible coatings for microfluidic devices : cell culture and flow studies with glial cells.

Abstract

Oxygen plasma treatment of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) thin films produced a hydrophilic surface that was biocompatible and resistant to biofouling in microfluidic studies. Thin film coatings of PDMS were previously developed to provide protection for semiconductor-based microoptical devices from rapid degradation by biofluids. However, the hydrophobic surface of native PDMS induced rapid clogging of microfluidic channels with glial cells. To evaluate the various issues of surface hydrophobicity and chemistry on material biocompatibility, we tested both native and oxidized PDMS (ox-PDMS) coatings as well as bare silicon and hydrophobic alkane and hydrophilic oligoethylene glycol silane monolayer coated under both cell culture and microfluidic studies. For the culture studies, the observed trend was that the hydrophilic surfaces supported cell adhesion and growth, whereas the hydrophobic ones were inhibitive. However, for the fluidic studies, a glass-silicon microfluidic device coated with the hydrophilic ox-PDMS had an unperturbed flow rate over 14 min of operation, whereas the uncoated device suffered a loss in rate of 12%, and the native PDMS coating showed a loss of nearly 40%. Possible protein modification of the surfaces from the culture medium also were examined with adsorbed films of albumin, collagen, and fibrinogen to evaluate their effect on cell adhesion.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
952788
Report Number(s):
SAND2004-2597J
TRN: US200914%%107
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Proposed for publication in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research.
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Proposed for publication in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ADHESION; ALKANES; BIOLOGICAL FOULING; CELL CULTURES; CHEMISTRY; COATINGS; COLLAGEN; FIBRINOGEN; FLOW RATE; GLYCOLS; MODIFICATIONS; OXYGEN; PROTEINS; SILANES; SILICON; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Peterson, Sophie Louise, Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio, Gourley, Paul Lee, and McDonald, Anthony Eugene. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) thin films as biocompatible coatings for microfluidic devices : cell culture and flow studies with glial cells.. United States: N. p., 2004. Web.
Peterson, Sophie Louise, Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio, Gourley, Paul Lee, & McDonald, Anthony Eugene. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) thin films as biocompatible coatings for microfluidic devices : cell culture and flow studies with glial cells.. United States.
Peterson, Sophie Louise, Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio, Gourley, Paul Lee, and McDonald, Anthony Eugene. Tue . "Poly(dimethylsiloxane) thin films as biocompatible coatings for microfluidic devices : cell culture and flow studies with glial cells.". United States.
@article{osti_952788,
title = {Poly(dimethylsiloxane) thin films as biocompatible coatings for microfluidic devices : cell culture and flow studies with glial cells.},
author = {Peterson, Sophie Louise and Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio and Gourley, Paul Lee and McDonald, Anthony Eugene},
abstractNote = {Oxygen plasma treatment of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) thin films produced a hydrophilic surface that was biocompatible and resistant to biofouling in microfluidic studies. Thin film coatings of PDMS were previously developed to provide protection for semiconductor-based microoptical devices from rapid degradation by biofluids. However, the hydrophobic surface of native PDMS induced rapid clogging of microfluidic channels with glial cells. To evaluate the various issues of surface hydrophobicity and chemistry on material biocompatibility, we tested both native and oxidized PDMS (ox-PDMS) coatings as well as bare silicon and hydrophobic alkane and hydrophilic oligoethylene glycol silane monolayer coated under both cell culture and microfluidic studies. For the culture studies, the observed trend was that the hydrophilic surfaces supported cell adhesion and growth, whereas the hydrophobic ones were inhibitive. However, for the fluidic studies, a glass-silicon microfluidic device coated with the hydrophilic ox-PDMS had an unperturbed flow rate over 14 min of operation, whereas the uncoated device suffered a loss in rate of 12%, and the native PDMS coating showed a loss of nearly 40%. Possible protein modification of the surfaces from the culture medium also were examined with adsorbed films of albumin, collagen, and fibrinogen to evaluate their effect on cell adhesion.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proposed for publication in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {6}
}