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Title: Enhancing RHIC luminosity capabilities with in-situ beam piple coating

Abstract

Electron clouds have been observed in many accelerators, including the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). They can limit the machine performance through pressure degradation, beam instabilities or incoherent emittance growth. The formation of electron clouds can be suppressed with beam pipe surfaces that have low secondary electron yield. At the same time, high wall resistivity in accelerators can result in levels of ohmic heating unacceptably high for superconducting magnets. This is a concern for the RHIC machine, as its vacuum chamber in the superconducting dipoles is made from relatively high resistivity 316LN stainless steel. The high resistivity can be addressed with a copper (Cu) coating; a reduction in the secondary electron yield can be achieved with a titanium nitride (TiN) or amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. Applying such coatings in an already constructed machine is rather challenging. We started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for in-situ coating of long, small diameter tubes. The technique entails fabricating a device comprised of staged magnetrons and/or cathodic arcs mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of about 5 {micro}m (a few skin depths) of Cu followed by about 0.1 {micro}m of TiN (or a-C).

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
952543
Report Number(s):
BNL-81821-2009-CP
KB0202011; TRN: US0902530
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Particle Accelerator Conference; Vancouver, B.C., Canada; 20090504 through 20090508
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; CARBON; COATINGS; COPPER; DEPOSITION; DIPOLES; HEATING; HEAVY IONS; LUMINOSITY; MAGNETRONS; PERFORMANCE; STAINLESS STEELS; SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS; TITANIUM NITRIDES

Citation Formats

Herschcovitch, A, Blaskiewicz, M, Fischer, W, and Poole, H J. Enhancing RHIC luminosity capabilities with in-situ beam piple coating. United States: N. p., 2009. Web.
Herschcovitch, A, Blaskiewicz, M, Fischer, W, & Poole, H J. Enhancing RHIC luminosity capabilities with in-situ beam piple coating. United States.
Herschcovitch, A, Blaskiewicz, M, Fischer, W, and Poole, H J. Mon . "Enhancing RHIC luminosity capabilities with in-situ beam piple coating". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/952543.
@article{osti_952543,
title = {Enhancing RHIC luminosity capabilities with in-situ beam piple coating},
author = {Herschcovitch, A and Blaskiewicz, M and Fischer, W and Poole, H J},
abstractNote = {Electron clouds have been observed in many accelerators, including the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). They can limit the machine performance through pressure degradation, beam instabilities or incoherent emittance growth. The formation of electron clouds can be suppressed with beam pipe surfaces that have low secondary electron yield. At the same time, high wall resistivity in accelerators can result in levels of ohmic heating unacceptably high for superconducting magnets. This is a concern for the RHIC machine, as its vacuum chamber in the superconducting dipoles is made from relatively high resistivity 316LN stainless steel. The high resistivity can be addressed with a copper (Cu) coating; a reduction in the secondary electron yield can be achieved with a titanium nitride (TiN) or amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. Applying such coatings in an already constructed machine is rather challenging. We started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for in-situ coating of long, small diameter tubes. The technique entails fabricating a device comprised of staged magnetrons and/or cathodic arcs mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of about 5 {micro}m (a few skin depths) of Cu followed by about 0.1 {micro}m of TiN (or a-C).},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {5}
}

Conference:
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