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Title: Single crystal neutron diffraction for the inorganic chemist - a practical guide.

Abstract

Advances and upgrades in neutron sources and instrumentation are poised to make neutron diffraction more accessible to inorganic chemists than ever before. These improvements will pave the way for single crystal investigations that currently may be difficult, for example due to small crystal size or large unit cell volume. This article aims to highlight what can presently be achieved in neutron diffraction and looks forward toward future applications of neutron scattering in inorganic chemistry.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
952198
Report Number(s):
ANL/IPNS/JA-58995
TRN: US0902402
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Comm. Inorg. Chem.; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CHEMISTRY; MONOCRYSTALS; NEUTRON DIFFRACTION; NEUTRON SOURCES; NEUTRONS; SCATTERING

Citation Formats

Piccoli, P., Koetzle, T. F., Schultz, A. J., and Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. Single crystal neutron diffraction for the inorganic chemist - a practical guide.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1080/02603590701394741.
Piccoli, P., Koetzle, T. F., Schultz, A. J., & Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. Single crystal neutron diffraction for the inorganic chemist - a practical guide.. United States. doi:10.1080/02603590701394741.
Piccoli, P., Koetzle, T. F., Schultz, A. J., and Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. Mon . "Single crystal neutron diffraction for the inorganic chemist - a practical guide.". United States. doi:10.1080/02603590701394741.
@article{osti_952198,
title = {Single crystal neutron diffraction for the inorganic chemist - a practical guide.},
author = {Piccoli, P. and Koetzle, T. F. and Schultz, A. J. and Intense Pulsed Neutron Source},
abstractNote = {Advances and upgrades in neutron sources and instrumentation are poised to make neutron diffraction more accessible to inorganic chemists than ever before. These improvements will pave the way for single crystal investigations that currently may be difficult, for example due to small crystal size or large unit cell volume. This article aims to highlight what can presently be achieved in neutron diffraction and looks forward toward future applications of neutron scattering in inorganic chemistry.},
doi = {10.1080/02603590701394741},
journal = {Comm. Inorg. Chem.},
number = 2007,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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