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Title: On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.

Abstract

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.

Authors:
;  [1];  [1]
  1. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
952158
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-1209J
TRN: US200913%%393
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proposed for publication in the Journal of Hazardous Materials.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; CORIOLIS FORCE; FLUID MECHANICS; GAS SPILLS; LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS; MODIFICATIONS; NATURAL GAS; SPECIFICATIONS; VALIDATION

Citation Formats

Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine, Koopman, Ronald P., and Ermak, Donald. On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine, Koopman, Ronald P., & Ermak, Donald. On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.. United States.
Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine, Koopman, Ronald P., and Ermak, Donald. Wed . "On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_952158,
title = {On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.},
author = {Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine and Koopman, Ronald P. and Ermak, Donald},
abstractNote = {Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proposed for publication in the Journal of Hazardous Materials.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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