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Title: Analysis of the benefits of carbon credits to hydrogen addition to midsize gas turbine feedstocks.

Abstract

The addition of hydrogen to the natural gas feedstocks of midsize (30-150 MW) gas turbines was analyzed as a method of reducing nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and CO{sub 2} emissions. In particular, the costs of hydrogen addition were evaluated against the combined costs for other current NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} emissions control technologies for both existing and new systems to determine its benefits and market feasibility. Markets for NO{sub x} emissions credits currently exist in California and the Northeast States and are expected to grow. Although regulations are not currently in place in the United States, several other countries have implemented carbon tax and carbon credit programs. The analysis thus assumes that the United States adopts future legislation similar to these programs. Therefore, potential sale of emissions credits for volunteer retrofits was also included in the study. It was found that hydrogen addition is a competitive alternative to traditional emissions abatement techniques under certain conditions. The existence of carbon credits shifts the system economics in favor of hydrogen addition.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Energetics Inc., Washington, DC)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
952134
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-0889J
TRN: US200913%%382
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proposed for publication in the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 08 HYDROGEN; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CARBON; ECONOMICS; GAS TURBINES; HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN ADDITIONS; LEGISLATION; MARKET; NATURAL GAS; NITROGEN OXIDES; REGULATIONS; SALES

Citation Formats

Miller, J., Towns, B., Keller, Jay O., Schefer, Robert W., and Skolnik, Edward G. Analysis of the benefits of carbon credits to hydrogen addition to midsize gas turbine feedstocks.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Miller, J., Towns, B., Keller, Jay O., Schefer, Robert W., & Skolnik, Edward G. Analysis of the benefits of carbon credits to hydrogen addition to midsize gas turbine feedstocks.. United States.
Miller, J., Towns, B., Keller, Jay O., Schefer, Robert W., and Skolnik, Edward G. Wed . "Analysis of the benefits of carbon credits to hydrogen addition to midsize gas turbine feedstocks.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_952134,
title = {Analysis of the benefits of carbon credits to hydrogen addition to midsize gas turbine feedstocks.},
author = {Miller, J. and Towns, B. and Keller, Jay O. and Schefer, Robert W. and Skolnik, Edward G.},
abstractNote = {The addition of hydrogen to the natural gas feedstocks of midsize (30-150 MW) gas turbines was analyzed as a method of reducing nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and CO{sub 2} emissions. In particular, the costs of hydrogen addition were evaluated against the combined costs for other current NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} emissions control technologies for both existing and new systems to determine its benefits and market feasibility. Markets for NO{sub x} emissions credits currently exist in California and the Northeast States and are expected to grow. Although regulations are not currently in place in the United States, several other countries have implemented carbon tax and carbon credit programs. The analysis thus assumes that the United States adopts future legislation similar to these programs. Therefore, potential sale of emissions credits for volunteer retrofits was also included in the study. It was found that hydrogen addition is a competitive alternative to traditional emissions abatement techniques under certain conditions. The existence of carbon credits shifts the system economics in favor of hydrogen addition.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proposed for publication in the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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