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Title: Emergency response guidance for the first 48 hours after the outdoors detonation of an explosive radiological dispersal device.

Abstract

Strategies and decisions to protect emergency responders, the public, and critical infrastructure against the effects of a radiological dispersal device detonated outdoors must be made in the planning stage, not in the early period just after an attack. This contrasts with planning for small-scale types of radiological or nuclear emergencies, or for a large-scale nuclear-power-type accident that evolves over many hours or days before radioactivity is released to the environment, such that its effects can be prospectively modeled and analyzed. By the time it is known an attack has occurred, most likely there will have been casualties, all the radioactive material will have been released, plume growth will be progressing, and there will be no time left for evaluating possible countermeasures. This paper offers guidance to planners, first responders, and senior decision makers to assist them in developing strategies for protective actions and operational procedures for the first 48 hours after an explosive radiological dispersal device has been detonated.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
952101
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-0964J
TRN: US0902382
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proposed for publication in Health Physics Journal.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; EXPLOSIONS; OUTDOORS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; EMERGENCY PLANS; RECOMMENDATIONS; RADIATION PROTECTION

Citation Formats

Harper, Frederick Taylor, and Musolino, Stephen V. Emergency response guidance for the first 48 hours after the outdoors detonation of an explosive radiological dispersal device.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Harper, Frederick Taylor, & Musolino, Stephen V. Emergency response guidance for the first 48 hours after the outdoors detonation of an explosive radiological dispersal device.. United States.
Harper, Frederick Taylor, and Musolino, Stephen V. Wed . "Emergency response guidance for the first 48 hours after the outdoors detonation of an explosive radiological dispersal device.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_952101,
title = {Emergency response guidance for the first 48 hours after the outdoors detonation of an explosive radiological dispersal device.},
author = {Harper, Frederick Taylor and Musolino, Stephen V.},
abstractNote = {Strategies and decisions to protect emergency responders, the public, and critical infrastructure against the effects of a radiological dispersal device detonated outdoors must be made in the planning stage, not in the early period just after an attack. This contrasts with planning for small-scale types of radiological or nuclear emergencies, or for a large-scale nuclear-power-type accident that evolves over many hours or days before radioactivity is released to the environment, such that its effects can be prospectively modeled and analyzed. By the time it is known an attack has occurred, most likely there will have been casualties, all the radioactive material will have been released, plume growth will be progressing, and there will be no time left for evaluating possible countermeasures. This paper offers guidance to planners, first responders, and senior decision makers to assist them in developing strategies for protective actions and operational procedures for the first 48 hours after an explosive radiological dispersal device has been detonated.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proposed for publication in Health Physics Journal.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}