skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: DAiSES: Dynamic Adaptivity in Support of Extreme Scale Department of Energy Project No. ER25622 Prime Contract No. DE-FG02-04ER25622 Final Report for September 15, 2004-September 14, 2008

Abstract

The DAiSES project [Te04] was focused on enabling conventional operating systems, in particular, those running on extreme scale systems, to dynamically customize system resource management in order to offer applications the best possible environment in which to execute. Such dynamic adaptation allows operating systems to modify the execution environment in response to changes in workload behavior and system state. The main challenges of this project included determination of what operating system (OS) algorithms, policies, and parameters should be adapted, when to adapt them, and how to adapt them. We addressed these challenges by using a combination of static analysis and runtime monitoring and adaptation to identify a priori profitable targets of adaptation and effective heuristics that can be used to dynamically trigger adaptation. Dynamic monitoring and adaptation of the OS was provided by either kernel modifications or the use of KernInst and Kperfmon [Wm04]. Since Linux, an open source OS, was our target OS, patches submitted by kernel developers and researchers often facilitated kernel modifications. KernInst operates on unmodified commodity operating systems, i.e., Solaris and Linux; it is fine-grained, thus, there were few constraints on how the underlying OS can be modified. Dynamically adaptive functionality of operating systems, both inmore » terms of policies and parameters, is intended to deliver the maximum attainable performance of a computational environment and meet, as best as possible, the needs of high-performance applications running on extreme scale systems, while meeting system constraints. DAiSES research endeavored to reach this goal by developing methodologies for dynamic adaptation of OS parameters and policies to manage stateful and stateless resources [Te06] and pursuing the following two objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms to dynamically sense, analyze, and adjust common performance metrics, fluctuating workload situations, and overall system environment conditions. (2) Demonstration, via Linux prototypes and experiments, of dynamic self-tuning and self-provisioning in HPC environments. From a high level, the DAiSES methodology, depicted in Figure 1, includes characterization of application resource usage patterns, identification of candidate (profitable) adaptation targets, determination of feasible adaptation ranges, definition of heuristics to trigger adaptation, design and implementation of OS monitoring, triggering, and adaptation code, and quantification of performance gains.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The University of Texas at El Paso
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
951983
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/25622-1
TRN: US201002%%341
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-04ER25622
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; ALGORITHMS; DESIGN; IMPLEMENTATION; KERNELS; METRICS; MODIFICATIONS; MONITORING; PERFORMANCE; RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; TARGETS

Citation Formats

PI: Patricia J. Teller, Ph.D. University of Texas-El Paso Department of Computer Science. DAiSES: Dynamic Adaptivity in Support of Extreme Scale Department of Energy Project No. ER25622 Prime Contract No. DE-FG02-04ER25622 Final Report for September 15, 2004-September 14, 2008. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.2172/951983.
PI: Patricia J. Teller, Ph.D. University of Texas-El Paso Department of Computer Science. DAiSES: Dynamic Adaptivity in Support of Extreme Scale Department of Energy Project No. ER25622 Prime Contract No. DE-FG02-04ER25622 Final Report for September 15, 2004-September 14, 2008. United States. doi:10.2172/951983.
PI: Patricia J. Teller, Ph.D. University of Texas-El Paso Department of Computer Science. Tue . "DAiSES: Dynamic Adaptivity in Support of Extreme Scale Department of Energy Project No. ER25622 Prime Contract No. DE-FG02-04ER25622 Final Report for September 15, 2004-September 14, 2008". United States. doi:10.2172/951983. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/951983.
@article{osti_951983,
title = {DAiSES: Dynamic Adaptivity in Support of Extreme Scale Department of Energy Project No. ER25622 Prime Contract No. DE-FG02-04ER25622 Final Report for September 15, 2004-September 14, 2008},
author = {PI: Patricia J. Teller, Ph.D. University of Texas-El Paso Department of Computer Science},
abstractNote = {The DAiSES project [Te04] was focused on enabling conventional operating systems, in particular, those running on extreme scale systems, to dynamically customize system resource management in order to offer applications the best possible environment in which to execute. Such dynamic adaptation allows operating systems to modify the execution environment in response to changes in workload behavior and system state. The main challenges of this project included determination of what operating system (OS) algorithms, policies, and parameters should be adapted, when to adapt them, and how to adapt them. We addressed these challenges by using a combination of static analysis and runtime monitoring and adaptation to identify a priori profitable targets of adaptation and effective heuristics that can be used to dynamically trigger adaptation. Dynamic monitoring and adaptation of the OS was provided by either kernel modifications or the use of KernInst and Kperfmon [Wm04]. Since Linux, an open source OS, was our target OS, patches submitted by kernel developers and researchers often facilitated kernel modifications. KernInst operates on unmodified commodity operating systems, i.e., Solaris and Linux; it is fine-grained, thus, there were few constraints on how the underlying OS can be modified. Dynamically adaptive functionality of operating systems, both in terms of policies and parameters, is intended to deliver the maximum attainable performance of a computational environment and meet, as best as possible, the needs of high-performance applications running on extreme scale systems, while meeting system constraints. DAiSES research endeavored to reach this goal by developing methodologies for dynamic adaptation of OS parameters and policies to manage stateful and stateless resources [Te06] and pursuing the following two objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms to dynamically sense, analyze, and adjust common performance metrics, fluctuating workload situations, and overall system environment conditions. (2) Demonstration, via Linux prototypes and experiments, of dynamic self-tuning and self-provisioning in HPC environments. From a high level, the DAiSES methodology, depicted in Figure 1, includes characterization of application resource usage patterns, identification of candidate (profitable) adaptation targets, determination of feasible adaptation ranges, definition of heuristics to trigger adaptation, design and implementation of OS monitoring, triggering, and adaptation code, and quantification of performance gains.},
doi = {10.2172/951983},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2009},
month = {Tue May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2009}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: