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Title: Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.

Abstract

Modified bentonites are of widespread technological importance. Common modifications include acid activation and organic treatment. Acid activation has been used for decades to prepare bleaching earths for adsorbing impurities from edible and industrial oils. Organic treatment has sparked an explosive interest in a class of materials called polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNs). The most commonly used clay mineral in PCNs is montmorillonite, which is the main constituent of bentonite. PCN materials are used for structural reinforcement and mechanical strength, for gas permeability barriers, as flame retardants, and to minimize surface erosion (ablation). Other specialty applications include use as conducting nanocomposites and bionanocomposites.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); Slovak Granting Agencies
OSTI Identifier:
951903
Report Number(s):
ANL/CNM/JA-64159
Journal ID: ISSN 1811-5209; TRN: US200913%%161
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Elements; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: Apr. 2009
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; BENTONITE; MONTMORILLONITE; POLYMERS; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; NANOSTRUCTURES; USES

Citation Formats

Carrado, K. A., Komadel, P., Center for Nanoscale Materials, and Slovak Academy of Sciences. Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.2113/gselements.5.2.111.
Carrado, K. A., Komadel, P., Center for Nanoscale Materials, & Slovak Academy of Sciences. Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.. United States. doi:10.2113/gselements.5.2.111.
Carrado, K. A., Komadel, P., Center for Nanoscale Materials, and Slovak Academy of Sciences. 2009. "Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.". United States. doi:10.2113/gselements.5.2.111.
@article{osti_951903,
title = {Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.},
author = {Carrado, K. A. and Komadel, P. and Center for Nanoscale Materials and Slovak Academy of Sciences},
abstractNote = {Modified bentonites are of widespread technological importance. Common modifications include acid activation and organic treatment. Acid activation has been used for decades to prepare bleaching earths for adsorbing impurities from edible and industrial oils. Organic treatment has sparked an explosive interest in a class of materials called polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNs). The most commonly used clay mineral in PCNs is montmorillonite, which is the main constituent of bentonite. PCN materials are used for structural reinforcement and mechanical strength, for gas permeability barriers, as flame retardants, and to minimize surface erosion (ablation). Other specialty applications include use as conducting nanocomposites and bionanocomposites.},
doi = {10.2113/gselements.5.2.111},
journal = {Elements},
number = Apr. 2009,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month = 4
}
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