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Title: Aqueous and gaseous nitrogen losses induced by fertilizer application

Abstract

In recent years concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use to nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) water pollution and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) atmospheric pollution. Characterizing soil N effluxes is essential in developing a strategy to mitigate N leaching and emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, a previously described and tested mechanistic N cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) was successfully tested against additional observations of soil pH and N{sub 2}O emissions after fertilization and irrigation, and before plant emergence. We used TOUGHREACT-N to explain the significantly different N gas emissions and nitrate leaching rates resulting from the different N fertilizer types, application methods, and soil properties. The N{sub 2}O emissions from NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N fertilizer were higher than from urea and NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N fertilizers in coarse-textured soils. This difference increased with decreases in fertilization application rate and increases in soil buffering capacity. In contrast to methods used to estimate global terrestrial gas emissions, we found strongly non-linear N{sub 2}O emissions as a function of fertilizer application rate and soil calcite content. Speciation of predicted gas N flux into N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} depended on pH, fertilizer form, and soilmore » properties. Our results highlighted the need to derive emission and leaching factors that account for fertilizer type, application method, and soil properties.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Earth Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
951005
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1689E
Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227; TRN: US200911%%225
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research--Biogeosciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2009; Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; 58; AMMONIA; CALCITE; CAPACITY; FERTILIZATION; FERTILIZERS; IRRIGATION; LEACHING; NITRATES; NITRIC OXIDE; NITROGEN; NITROUS OXIDE; POLLUTION; SOILS; UREA; WATER POLLUTION

Citation Formats

Gu, C, Maggi, F, Riley, W J, Hornberger, G M, Xu, T, Oldenburg, C M, Spycher, N, Miller, N L, Venterea, R T, and Steefel, C. Aqueous and gaseous nitrogen losses induced by fertilizer application. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1029/2008JG000788.
Gu, C, Maggi, F, Riley, W J, Hornberger, G M, Xu, T, Oldenburg, C M, Spycher, N, Miller, N L, Venterea, R T, & Steefel, C. Aqueous and gaseous nitrogen losses induced by fertilizer application. United States. doi:10.1029/2008JG000788.
Gu, C, Maggi, F, Riley, W J, Hornberger, G M, Xu, T, Oldenburg, C M, Spycher, N, Miller, N L, Venterea, R T, and Steefel, C. Thu . "Aqueous and gaseous nitrogen losses induced by fertilizer application". United States. doi:10.1029/2008JG000788. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/951005.
@article{osti_951005,
title = {Aqueous and gaseous nitrogen losses induced by fertilizer application},
author = {Gu, C and Maggi, F and Riley, W J and Hornberger, G M and Xu, T and Oldenburg, C M and Spycher, N and Miller, N L and Venterea, R T and Steefel, C},
abstractNote = {In recent years concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use to nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) water pollution and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) atmospheric pollution. Characterizing soil N effluxes is essential in developing a strategy to mitigate N leaching and emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, a previously described and tested mechanistic N cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) was successfully tested against additional observations of soil pH and N{sub 2}O emissions after fertilization and irrigation, and before plant emergence. We used TOUGHREACT-N to explain the significantly different N gas emissions and nitrate leaching rates resulting from the different N fertilizer types, application methods, and soil properties. The N{sub 2}O emissions from NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N fertilizer were higher than from urea and NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N fertilizers in coarse-textured soils. This difference increased with decreases in fertilization application rate and increases in soil buffering capacity. In contrast to methods used to estimate global terrestrial gas emissions, we found strongly non-linear N{sub 2}O emissions as a function of fertilizer application rate and soil calcite content. Speciation of predicted gas N flux into N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} depended on pH, fertilizer form, and soil properties. Our results highlighted the need to derive emission and leaching factors that account for fertilizer type, application method, and soil properties.},
doi = {10.1029/2008JG000788},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research--Biogeosciences},
issn = {0148-0227},
number = ,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {1}
}