skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Adaptive Optics for Direct Detection of Extrasolar Planets: The Gemini Planet Imager

Abstract

The direct detection of photons emitted or reflected by extrasolar planets, spatially resolved from their parent star, is a major frontier in the study of other solar systems. Direct detection will provide statistical information on planets in 5-50 AU orbits, inaccessible to current Doppler searches, and allow spectral characterization of radius, temperature, surface gravity, and perhaps composition. Achieving this will require new dedicated high-contrast instruments. One such system under construction is the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) This combines a high-order/high-speed adaptive optics system to control wavefront errors from the Earth's atmosphere, an advanced coronagraph to block diffraction, ultrasmooth optics, a precision infrared interferometer to measure and correct systematic errors, and a integral field spectrograph/polarimeter to image and characterize target planetary systems. We predict that GPI will be able to detect planets with brightness less than 10{sup -7} of their parent star, sufficient to observe warm self-luminous planets around a large population of targets.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
950621
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-230274
TRN: US0902020
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Comptes rendus - Physique, vol. 8, no. 3-4, April 1, 2007, pp. 365-373; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 3-4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUMM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ACCURACY; BRIGHTNESS; CONSTRUCTION; DETECTION; DIFFRACTION; INTERFEROMETERS; OPTICS; PHOTONS; PLANETS; SOLAR SYSTEM; TARGETS

Citation Formats

Macintosh, B, Graham, J, Palmer, D, Doyon, R, Gavel, D, Larkin, J, Oppenheimer, B, Saddlemyer, L, Wallace, J K, Bauman, B, Erikson, D, Poyneer, L, Sivaramakrishnan, A, Soummer, R, and Veran, J. Adaptive Optics for Direct Detection of Extrasolar Planets: The Gemini Planet Imager. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.crhy.2007.04.007.
Macintosh, B, Graham, J, Palmer, D, Doyon, R, Gavel, D, Larkin, J, Oppenheimer, B, Saddlemyer, L, Wallace, J K, Bauman, B, Erikson, D, Poyneer, L, Sivaramakrishnan, A, Soummer, R, & Veran, J. Adaptive Optics for Direct Detection of Extrasolar Planets: The Gemini Planet Imager. United States. doi:10.1016/j.crhy.2007.04.007.
Macintosh, B, Graham, J, Palmer, D, Doyon, R, Gavel, D, Larkin, J, Oppenheimer, B, Saddlemyer, L, Wallace, J K, Bauman, B, Erikson, D, Poyneer, L, Sivaramakrishnan, A, Soummer, R, and Veran, J. Tue . "Adaptive Optics for Direct Detection of Extrasolar Planets: The Gemini Planet Imager". United States. doi:10.1016/j.crhy.2007.04.007. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/950621.
@article{osti_950621,
title = {Adaptive Optics for Direct Detection of Extrasolar Planets: The Gemini Planet Imager},
author = {Macintosh, B and Graham, J and Palmer, D and Doyon, R and Gavel, D and Larkin, J and Oppenheimer, B and Saddlemyer, L and Wallace, J K and Bauman, B and Erikson, D and Poyneer, L and Sivaramakrishnan, A and Soummer, R and Veran, J},
abstractNote = {The direct detection of photons emitted or reflected by extrasolar planets, spatially resolved from their parent star, is a major frontier in the study of other solar systems. Direct detection will provide statistical information on planets in 5-50 AU orbits, inaccessible to current Doppler searches, and allow spectral characterization of radius, temperature, surface gravity, and perhaps composition. Achieving this will require new dedicated high-contrast instruments. One such system under construction is the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) This combines a high-order/high-speed adaptive optics system to control wavefront errors from the Earth's atmosphere, an advanced coronagraph to block diffraction, ultrasmooth optics, a precision infrared interferometer to measure and correct systematic errors, and a integral field spectrograph/polarimeter to image and characterize target planetary systems. We predict that GPI will be able to detect planets with brightness less than 10{sup -7} of their parent star, sufficient to observe warm self-luminous planets around a large population of targets.},
doi = {10.1016/j.crhy.2007.04.007},
journal = {Comptes rendus - Physique, vol. 8, no. 3-4, April 1, 2007, pp. 365-373},
number = 3-4,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}