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Title: Development of a Regional Routing Model for Strategic Waterway Analysis

Abstract

The NETS (Navigation Economics Technologies) suite of models is being developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to bring new analytic tools to the process of evaluating and planning navigation investments. A hierarchical and potentially iterative approach consisting of three levels, or tiers, has been proposed, one that moves from a broad regional and global geography in Tier 1, down to a detailed, project and facility specific level of detail in Tier 3. This paper describes the construction a commodity flows database to support Tier 2 modeling. Called the Regional Routing Model, it takes spatial disaggregations of broad regionally forecasts of commodity flows to a point where they can be assigned to specific modes and routes over the U.S. transportation network. The paper describes the model structure and how it is being tied closely to a multi-source database constructed to support base year model calibration. A goal for the model is to be able to measure the effects on flows and transportation costs of changes to either the capacity of the transportation network or to the volumes of goods produced and consumed. Some preliminary results are shown.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Institute for Water Resources
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); National Transportation Research Center
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
950430
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transportation Research Record; Journal Volume: 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; CAPACITY; ECONOMICS; NAVIGATION; ROUTING; SIMULATION; US CORPS OF ENGINEERS; TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS; INLAND WATERWAYS; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; freight mode/route choice; multi-commodity assignment; freight data

Citation Formats

Southworth, Frank, Peterson, Bruce E, and Lambert, Bruce. Development of a Regional Routing Model for Strategic Waterway Analysis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.3141/1993-15.
Southworth, Frank, Peterson, Bruce E, & Lambert, Bruce. Development of a Regional Routing Model for Strategic Waterway Analysis. United States. doi:10.3141/1993-15.
Southworth, Frank, Peterson, Bruce E, and Lambert, Bruce. Mon . "Development of a Regional Routing Model for Strategic Waterway Analysis". United States. doi:10.3141/1993-15.
@article{osti_950430,
title = {Development of a Regional Routing Model for Strategic Waterway Analysis},
author = {Southworth, Frank and Peterson, Bruce E and Lambert, Bruce},
abstractNote = {The NETS (Navigation Economics Technologies) suite of models is being developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to bring new analytic tools to the process of evaluating and planning navigation investments. A hierarchical and potentially iterative approach consisting of three levels, or tiers, has been proposed, one that moves from a broad regional and global geography in Tier 1, down to a detailed, project and facility specific level of detail in Tier 3. This paper describes the construction a commodity flows database to support Tier 2 modeling. Called the Regional Routing Model, it takes spatial disaggregations of broad regionally forecasts of commodity flows to a point where they can be assigned to specific modes and routes over the U.S. transportation network. The paper describes the model structure and how it is being tied closely to a multi-source database constructed to support base year model calibration. A goal for the model is to be able to measure the effects on flows and transportation costs of changes to either the capacity of the transportation network or to the volumes of goods produced and consumed. Some preliminary results are shown.},
doi = {10.3141/1993-15},
journal = {Transportation Research Record},
number = ,
volume = 1993,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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