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Title: An ELISA Microarray Platform for Validating Cancer Biomarkers.

Abstract

The number of known circulating proteins that have potential for detecting cancer is rapidly growing. It seems clear, though, that variability in biomarker levels in both healthy and diseased populations will prevent most of these proteins from being useful. It also appears that a unique profile of biomarkers will be needed to accurately detect each type of cancer and that it will be necessary to evaluate blood samples from thousands of people to validate that profile. We are developing an antibody microarray platform that can be used to efficiently accomplish this task.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
948416
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-50987
400412000; TRN: US200906%%335
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: BIOforum Europe, 10:14-15; Journal Volume: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BLOOD; ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY; NEOPLASMS; PROTEINS

Citation Formats

Zangar, Richard C. An ELISA Microarray Platform for Validating Cancer Biomarkers.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Zangar, Richard C. An ELISA Microarray Platform for Validating Cancer Biomarkers.. United States.
Zangar, Richard C. Sun . "An ELISA Microarray Platform for Validating Cancer Biomarkers.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_948416,
title = {An ELISA Microarray Platform for Validating Cancer Biomarkers.},
author = {Zangar, Richard C.},
abstractNote = {The number of known circulating proteins that have potential for detecting cancer is rapidly growing. It seems clear, though, that variability in biomarker levels in both healthy and diseased populations will prevent most of these proteins from being useful. It also appears that a unique profile of biomarkers will be needed to accurately detect each type of cancer and that it will be necessary to evaluate blood samples from thousands of people to validate that profile. We are developing an antibody microarray platform that can be used to efficiently accomplish this task.},
doi = {},
journal = {BIOforum Europe, 10:14-15},
number = ,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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  • Identifying useful markers of cancer can be problematic due to limited amounts of sample. Some samples such as nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) or early-stage tumors are inherently small. Other samples such as serum are collected in larger volumes but archives of these samples are very valuable and only small amounts of each sample may be available for a single study. Also, given the diverse nature of cancer and the inherent variability in individual protein levels, it seems likely that the best approach to screen for cancer will be to determine the profile of a battery of proteins. As a result,more » a major challenge in identifying protein markers of disease is the ability to screen many proteins using very small amounts of sample. In this review, we outline some technological advances in proteomics that greatly advance this capability. Specifically, we propose a strategy for identifying markers of breast cancer in NAF that utilizes mass spectrometry (MS) to simultaneously screen hundreds or thousands of proteins in each sample. The best potential markers identified by the MS analysis can then be extensively characterized using an ELISA microarray assay. Because the microarray analysis is quantitative and large numbers of samples can be efficiently analyzed, this approach offers the ability to rapidly assess a battery of selected proteins in a manner that is directly relevant to traditional clinical assays.« less
  • Identifying useful markers of cancer can be problematic due to limited amounts of sample. Some samples such as nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) or early-stage tumors are inherently small. Other samples such as serum are collected in larger volumes but archives of these samples are very valuable and only small amounts of each sample may be available for a single study. Also, given the diverse nature of cancer and the inherent variability in individual protein levels, it seems likely that the best approach to screen for cancer will be to determine the profile of a battery of proteins. As a result,more » a major challenge in identifying protein markers of disease is the ability to screen many proteins using very small amounts of sample. In this review, we outline some technological advances in proteomics that greatly advance this capability. Specifically, we propose a strategy for identifying markers of breast cancer in NAF that utilizes mass spectrometry (MS) to simultaneously screen hundreds or thousands of proteins in each sample. The best potential markers identified by the MS analysis can then be extensively characterized using an ELISA microarray assay. Because the microarray analysis is quantitative and large numbers of samples can be efficiently analyzed, this approach offers the ability to rapidly assess a battery of selected proteins in a manner that is directly relevant to traditional clinical assays.« less
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