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Title: Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring

Abstract

The objective of Phase 1 of this STTR project is to demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) of the Geo-Rad system that integrates a location-aware SmartTag (made by ZonTrak) and a radiation detector (developed by LLNL). It also includes the ability to transmit the collected radiation data and location information to the ZonTrak server (ZonService). The collected data is further transmitted to a central server at LLNL (the Fusion Server) to be processed in conjunction with overhead imagery to generate location estimates of nuclear proliferation and radiation sources.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ZONTRAK, INC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
948045
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/84643-1 FINAL REPORT
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-06ER84643
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; Radiation, Data Fusion, Sensor netowrks, GPS, location-aware tags

Citation Formats

Adel Ghanem, Ph D. Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/948045.
Adel Ghanem, Ph D. Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring. United States. doi:10.2172/948045.
Adel Ghanem, Ph D. Fri . "Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring". United States. doi:10.2172/948045. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/948045.
@article{osti_948045,
title = {Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring},
author = {Adel Ghanem, Ph D},
abstractNote = {The objective of Phase 1 of this STTR project is to demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) of the Geo-Rad system that integrates a location-aware SmartTag (made by ZonTrak) and a radiation detector (developed by LLNL). It also includes the ability to transmit the collected radiation data and location information to the ZonTrak server (ZonService). The collected data is further transmitted to a central server at LLNL (the Fusion Server) to be processed in conjunction with overhead imagery to generate location estimates of nuclear proliferation and radiation sources.},
doi = {10.2172/948045},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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