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Title: Effect of microstructure on sliding contact damage and wear of ceramic coatings.

Abstract

Hard and wear resistant ceramics coatings are often applied to metallic surfaces to enhance their tribological performance. Using the scratch and twin roller tests, we evaluated the surface contact damage and the mechanism of wear in different ceramic coating. In amorphous diamond-like carbon coating, the damage and eventual material removal occurred by straight cracking that follows the trajectory of the tensile stresses. Damage in a crystalline titanium nitride (TiN) coating with a columnar grain structure occurred primarily by inter-columnar cracking perpendicular to the surface. For crystalline chromium nitride (CrN) coating with equiaxed grains, contact damage consisted primarily of grain boundary cracking and wear is due to surface-layer grain pullout. Results of the present study showed the dominant effect of ceramic coating microstructure on the contact damage and wear mechanism.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
947968
Report Number(s):
ANL/ET/CP-116946
TRN: US200905%%42
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 30th International Conference & Exposition on Advanced Ceramics and Composites; Jan. 22, 2006 - Jan. 27, 2006; Cocoa Beach, FL
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CARBON; CERAMICS; CHROMIUM NITRIDES; COATINGS; MICROSTRUCTURE; TITANIUM NITRIDES; WEAR RESISTANCE; MECHANICAL TESTS; DAMAGE

Citation Formats

Ajayi, O. O., Shareef, I., Fenske, G. R., Energy Technology, and Bradley Univ.. Effect of microstructure on sliding contact damage and wear of ceramic coatings.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Ajayi, O. O., Shareef, I., Fenske, G. R., Energy Technology, & Bradley Univ.. Effect of microstructure on sliding contact damage and wear of ceramic coatings.. United States.
Ajayi, O. O., Shareef, I., Fenske, G. R., Energy Technology, and Bradley Univ.. Sun . "Effect of microstructure on sliding contact damage and wear of ceramic coatings.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_947968,
title = {Effect of microstructure on sliding contact damage and wear of ceramic coatings.},
author = {Ajayi, O. O. and Shareef, I. and Fenske, G. R. and Energy Technology and Bradley Univ.},
abstractNote = {Hard and wear resistant ceramics coatings are often applied to metallic surfaces to enhance their tribological performance. Using the scratch and twin roller tests, we evaluated the surface contact damage and the mechanism of wear in different ceramic coating. In amorphous diamond-like carbon coating, the damage and eventual material removal occurred by straight cracking that follows the trajectory of the tensile stresses. Damage in a crystalline titanium nitride (TiN) coating with a columnar grain structure occurred primarily by inter-columnar cracking perpendicular to the surface. For crystalline chromium nitride (CrN) coating with equiaxed grains, contact damage consisted primarily of grain boundary cracking and wear is due to surface-layer grain pullout. Results of the present study showed the dominant effect of ceramic coating microstructure on the contact damage and wear mechanism.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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  • The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.
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  • The effects of microstructure and the counterface materials on the dry-sliding wear resistance of the aluminum matrix composites 2014Al-SiC and 6061Al-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] were studied. Experiments were performed within a load range of 0.9 to 350 N at a constant sliding velocity of 0.2 ms[sup [minus]1]. Two types of counterface materials, SAE 52100 bearing steel and mullite, were used. At low loads, where particles act as load-bearing constituents, the wear resistance of the 2014Al reinforced with 15.8 [mu]m diameter SiC was superior to that of the alloy with the same volume fraction of SiC but with 2.4 [mu]m diameter. Themore » wear rates of the composites worn against a steel slider were lower compared with those worn against a mullite slider because of the formation of iron-rich layers that act as in situ solid lubricants in the former case. With increasing the applied load, SiC and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] particles fractured and the wear rates of the composites increased to levels comparable to those of unreinforced matrix alloys. The transition to this regime was delayed to higher loads in the composites with a higher volume percentage of particles. Concurrent with particle fracture, large strains and strain gradients were generated within the aluminum layers adjacent to contact surfaces. This led to the subsurface crack growth and delamination. Because the particles and interfaces provided preferential sites for subsurface crack initiation and growth and because of the propensity of the broken particles to act as third-body abrasive elements at the contact surfaces, no improvement of the wear resistance was observed in the composites in this regime relative to unreinforced aluminum alloys. A second transition, to severe wear, occurred at higher loads when the contact surface temperature exceeded a critical value. The transition loads were higher in the composites. The alloys with higher volume fraction of reinforcement provided better resistance to severe wear.« less