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Title: A Network Layer for Teleoperations in High Speed Environments

Abstract

Teleoperation systems allow an operator to control a device at a remote location via a network [?, ?]. The stability of these systems is highly dependent on data loss and delay since command messages and the associated device feedback must remain synchronized [?]. The communication network is often cited as the source of delays and loss, however it is no longer the case with high speed optical networks. In a high speed environment, the end systems (operator and device) are the primary cause of poor system performance, since losses and delays are the result of saturated end systems. Given the speed and available bandwidth of optical networks, it is easy for a sender to overwhelm the receiver with messages. Another problem advanced teleoperations is each stream of information (command or feedback) may require a different type of network service, such as sensitivity to data loss and delay. As a result, no single transport protocol is suitable for transmitting the various feedback and command messages. Therefore a new teleoperation system is needed that provides greater protocol flexibility as well as management for systems using high speed networks.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
947496
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-54021
KJ0102000; TRN: US200909%%230
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE High-Speed Networks Workshop, 11-15
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMMUNICATIONS; FEEDBACK; FLEXIBILITY; MANAGEMENT; PERFORMANCE; SENSITIVITY; STABILITY; TRANSPORT; CONTROL SYSTEMS; REMOTE CONTROL; high speed network; teleoperations; remote control

Citation Formats

Lamarche, Brian L., Hopkins, Derek F., Hughes, Chad O., McKenna, Tom P., and Fulp, Errin W. A Network Layer for Teleoperations in High Speed Environments. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1109/HSNW.2007.4290537.
Lamarche, Brian L., Hopkins, Derek F., Hughes, Chad O., McKenna, Tom P., & Fulp, Errin W. A Network Layer for Teleoperations in High Speed Environments. United States. doi:10.1109/HSNW.2007.4290537.
Lamarche, Brian L., Hopkins, Derek F., Hughes, Chad O., McKenna, Tom P., and Fulp, Errin W. Tue . "A Network Layer for Teleoperations in High Speed Environments". United States. doi:10.1109/HSNW.2007.4290537.
@article{osti_947496,
title = {A Network Layer for Teleoperations in High Speed Environments},
author = {Lamarche, Brian L. and Hopkins, Derek F. and Hughes, Chad O. and McKenna, Tom P. and Fulp, Errin W.},
abstractNote = {Teleoperation systems allow an operator to control a device at a remote location via a network [?, ?]. The stability of these systems is highly dependent on data loss and delay since command messages and the associated device feedback must remain synchronized [?]. The communication network is often cited as the source of delays and loss, however it is no longer the case with high speed optical networks. In a high speed environment, the end systems (operator and device) are the primary cause of poor system performance, since losses and delays are the result of saturated end systems. Given the speed and available bandwidth of optical networks, it is easy for a sender to overwhelm the receiver with messages. Another problem advanced teleoperations is each stream of information (command or feedback) may require a different type of network service, such as sensitivity to data loss and delay. As a result, no single transport protocol is suitable for transmitting the various feedback and command messages. Therefore a new teleoperation system is needed that provides greater protocol flexibility as well as management for systems using high speed networks.},
doi = {10.1109/HSNW.2007.4290537},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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