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Title: University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor

Abstract

The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NNSA
OSTI Identifier:
946845
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-08-14856
TRN: US0901317
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; RESEARCH REACTORS; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; MODIFICATIONS; EFFICIENCY; Lessons Learned; Purdue University Reactor; University Reactor Conversion

Citation Formats

Eric C. Woolstenhulme, and Dana M. Hewit. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.2172/946845.
Eric C. Woolstenhulme, & Dana M. Hewit. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor. United States. doi:10.2172/946845.
Eric C. Woolstenhulme, and Dana M. Hewit. 2008. "University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor". United States. doi:10.2172/946845. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/946845.
@article{osti_946845,
title = {University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor},
author = {Eric C. Woolstenhulme and Dana M. Hewit},
abstractNote = {The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.},
doi = {10.2172/946845},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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  • The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.
  • The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at the University of Florida. This project was successfully completed through an integrated and collaborative effort involving the INL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), DOE (Headquarters and Field Office), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Universities, and contractors involved in analyses, fuel design and fabrication, and SNF shipping and disposition. With the work completed with these two universities, and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, INL convened and engaged the project participants in amore » structured discussion to capture lessons learned. The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the reactor conversions so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges.« less
  • Under the Reactor Sharing Program, a total of 350 high school students participated in the neutron activation experiment and 484 high school and university students and members of the general public participated in reactor tours.
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