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Title: Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program

Abstract

This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Caterpillar Incorporated
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
944410
DOE Contract Number:
FC26-00OR22806
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; TRUCKS; DIESEL ENGINES; THERMAL EFFICIENCY; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT

Citation Formats

Milam, David. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/944410.
Milam, David. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program. United States. doi:10.2172/944410.
Milam, David. Sun . "Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program". United States. doi:10.2172/944410. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/944410.
@article{osti_944410,
title = {Heavy Truck Clean Diesel Cooperative Research Program},
author = {Milam, David},
abstractNote = {This report is the final report for the Department of Energy on the Heavy Truck Engine Program (Contract No. DE-FC05-00OR22806) also known as Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program. Originally, this was scoped to be a $38M project over 5 years, to be 50/50 co-funded by DOE and Caterpillar. The program started in June 2000. During the program the timeline was extended to a sixth year. The program completed in December 2006. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate the technologies required to enable compliance with the 2007 and 2010 (0.2g/bhph NOx, 0.01g/bhph PM) on-highway emission standards for Heavy Duty Trucks in the US with improvements in fuel efficiency compared to today's engines. Thermal efficiency improvement from a baseline of 43% to 50% was targeted.},
doi = {10.2172/944410},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars, light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines submits to EPA an application for certification. In the application, the manufacturer gives a detailed technical description of the vehicles or engines he intends to market during the upcoming model-year. These engineering data include explanations and/or drawings which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems and exhaust and evaporative emission control systems. It also provides information on emission test procedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be followed during testing. Section 16 of the application containsmore » the results of emission testing, a statement of compliance to the regulations, production engine parameters and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.« less
  • Three crude shale oils were chosen from six candidates to investigate their possible use as substitutes for No. 2 diesel fuel. Satisfactory hot engine operation was achieved on the crudes using a fuel-heating system, allowing emissions characterization during transient and steady-state operation. Regulated gaseous emissions changed little with the crudes compared to diesel fuel; but total particulate and soluble organics increased, and larger injector tip deposits and piston crown erosion were observed. After engine rebuild, two minimally-processed shale oils were run without the fuel-heating system, causing no engine problems. Most emissions were higher than for No. 2 fuel using anmore » 80% distillate of crude shale oil, but lower using a hydrotreated form of the distillate.« less