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Title: Archaeological Activity Report: Post-Review Discoveries Within 45BN431 at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2

Abstract

During monitoring of remedial activities at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2 on August 19, 2005, a concentration of mussel shell was discovered in the west wall of a trench in the northen section of the waste site.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington Closure Hanford
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
944083
Report Number(s):
WCH-00142, Rev. 0
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC06-05RL14655
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Hanford Site; Archaeological; 128-F-2; Discovery; Mussel Shell

Citation Formats

T. E. Marceau, and J. J. Sharpe. Archaeological Activity Report: Post-Review Discoveries Within 45BN431 at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
T. E. Marceau, & J. J. Sharpe. Archaeological Activity Report: Post-Review Discoveries Within 45BN431 at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2. United States.
T. E. Marceau, and J. J. Sharpe. 2006. "Archaeological Activity Report: Post-Review Discoveries Within 45BN431 at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_944083,
title = {Archaeological Activity Report: Post-Review Discoveries Within 45BN431 at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2},
author = {T. E. Marceau and J. J. Sharpe},
abstractNote = {During monitoring of remedial activities at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2 on August 19, 2005, a concentration of mussel shell was discovered in the west wall of a trench in the northen section of the waste site.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month =
}

Technical Report:
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