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Title: Optical testing of layered microstructures with and without underlying vias.

Abstract

The response of microsystem components to laser irradiation is relevant to the use of laser processing, optical diagnostics, and optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device design and performance. The dimensions of MEMS are on the same order as infrared laser wavelengths which results in interference phenomena when the parts are partially transparent. Four distinct polycrystalline structures were designed and irradiated with 808 nm laser light to determine the effect of layers and the presence of a substrate via on the laser power threshold for damage. The presence of a substrate via resulted in lower damage thresholds, and interference phenomena resulted in a single layer structure having the highest damage threshold.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
943890
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-0915C
TRN: US200902%%349
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Thirteenth International Heat Transfer Conference held August 13-18, 2006 in Sydney, Australia.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; MICROELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; LASER RADIATION; IRRADIATION; CONNECTORS; DAMAGE

Citation Formats

Serrano, Justin Raymond, and Phinney, Leslie Mary. Optical testing of layered microstructures with and without underlying vias.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Serrano, Justin Raymond, & Phinney, Leslie Mary. Optical testing of layered microstructures with and without underlying vias.. United States.
Serrano, Justin Raymond, and Phinney, Leslie Mary. Wed . "Optical testing of layered microstructures with and without underlying vias.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_943890,
title = {Optical testing of layered microstructures with and without underlying vias.},
author = {Serrano, Justin Raymond and Phinney, Leslie Mary},
abstractNote = {The response of microsystem components to laser irradiation is relevant to the use of laser processing, optical diagnostics, and optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device design and performance. The dimensions of MEMS are on the same order as infrared laser wavelengths which results in interference phenomena when the parts are partially transparent. Four distinct polycrystalline structures were designed and irradiated with 808 nm laser light to determine the effect of layers and the presence of a substrate via on the laser power threshold for damage. The presence of a substrate via resulted in lower damage thresholds, and interference phenomena resulted in a single layer structure having the highest damage threshold.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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