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Title: Investigation of protein-protein interactions in the metal-reducing bacterium desulfobibrio vulgaris.

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [2]; ;  [2]; ;  [1];  [3];
  1. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)
  2. (Lawrence Berkeley National laboratory, Berkeley, CA)
  3. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
943859
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-0997C
TRN: US200902%%326
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Genomics: GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV held February 12-15, 2006 in Bethesda, MD.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; DESULFOVIBRIO; METALS; BIODEGRADATION; PROTEINS; INTERACTIONS

Citation Formats

Wahl, Judy D., Hazen, Terry, Gaucher, Sara P., Arkin, Adam P., Hadi, Masood Z., Joyner, Dominique, Chhabra, Swapnil, Zane, Grant, Alm, Eric, and Singh, Anup K. Investigation of protein-protein interactions in the metal-reducing bacterium desulfobibrio vulgaris.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Wahl, Judy D., Hazen, Terry, Gaucher, Sara P., Arkin, Adam P., Hadi, Masood Z., Joyner, Dominique, Chhabra, Swapnil, Zane, Grant, Alm, Eric, & Singh, Anup K. Investigation of protein-protein interactions in the metal-reducing bacterium desulfobibrio vulgaris.. United States.
Wahl, Judy D., Hazen, Terry, Gaucher, Sara P., Arkin, Adam P., Hadi, Masood Z., Joyner, Dominique, Chhabra, Swapnil, Zane, Grant, Alm, Eric, and Singh, Anup K. Wed . "Investigation of protein-protein interactions in the metal-reducing bacterium desulfobibrio vulgaris.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_943859,
title = {Investigation of protein-protein interactions in the metal-reducing bacterium desulfobibrio vulgaris.},
author = {Wahl, Judy D. and Hazen, Terry and Gaucher, Sara P. and Arkin, Adam P. and Hadi, Masood Z. and Joyner, Dominique and Chhabra, Swapnil and Zane, Grant and Alm, Eric and Singh, Anup K.},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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  • Uranium and its fission product Tc in aerobic environment will be in the forms of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. Reduced forms of tetravalent U and Tc are sparingly soluble. As determined by transmission electron microscopy, the reduction of uranyl acetate by immobilized cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans results in the production of black uraninite nanocrystals precipitated outside the cell. Some nanocrystals are associated with outer membranes of the cell as revealed from cross sections of these metabolic active sulfate-reducing bacteria. The nanocrystals have an average diameter of 5 nm and have anhedral shape. The reduction of Re{sup 7+}more » by cells of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans is fast in media containing H{sub 2} an electron donor, and slow in media containing lactic acid. It is proposed that the cytochrome in these cells has an important role in the reduction of uranyl and Re{sup 7+} is (a chemical analogue for Tc{sup 7+}) through transferring an electron from molecular hydrogen or lactic acid to the oxyions of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}.« less
  • Short communication.
  • A biotic approach for remediating subsurface sediments and groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chromium was evaluated. Cells of the Fe(iii)-reducing bacterium strain BrY were added to sealed, anoxic flasks containing Hanford groundwater, natural subsurface sediments, and either carbon tetrachloride, CT, or oxidized chromium, Cr(VI). With lactate as the electron donor, BrY transformed CT to chloroform (CF), which accumulated to about 1 0 % of the initial concentration of CT. The remainder of the CT was transformed to unidentified, nonvolatile compounds. Transformation of CT by BrY was an indirect process Cells reduced solid phase Fe(ill) to chemically reactive FE(II)more » that chemically transformed the chlorinated contaminant. Cr(VI), in contrast, was reduced by a direct enzymatic reaction in the presence or absence of Fe(III)-bearing sediments. These results demonstrate that Fe(ill)-reducing bacteria provide potential for transforming CT and for reducing CR(VI) to less toxic Cr(III). Technologies for stimulating indigenous populations of metal-reducing bacteria or for introducing specific metal-reducing bacteria to the subsurface are being investigated.« less
  • Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration drives physical and geochemical changes in deep subsurface environments that impact indigenous microbial activities. The combined effects of pressurized CO2 on a model sulfate-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, have been assessed using a suite of genomic and kinetic measurements. Novel high-pressure NMR time-series measurements using 13C-lactate were used to track D. vulgaris metabolism. We identified cessation of respiration at CO2 pressures of 10 bar, 25 bar, 50 bar, and 80 bar. Concurrent experiments using N2 as the pressurizing phase had no negative effect on microbial respiration, as inferred from reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Complementary pressurizedmore » batch incubations and fluorescence microscopy measurements supported NMR observations, and indicated that non-respiring cells were mostly viable at 50 bar CO2 for at least four hours, and at 80 bar CO2 for two hours. The fraction of dead cells increased rapidly after four hours at 80 bar CO2. Transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) measurements on mRNA transcripts from CO2-incubated biomass indicated that cells up-regulated the production of certain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine) following CO2 exposure at elevated pressures, likely as part of a general stress response. Evidence for other poorly understood stress responses were also identified within RNA-Seq data, suggesting that while pressurized CO2 severely limits the growth and respiration of D. vulgaris cells, biomass retains intact cell membranes at pressures up to 80 bar CO2. Together, these data show that geologic sequestration of CO2 may have significant impacts on rates of sulfate reduction in many deep subsurface environments where this metabolism is a key respiratory process.« less