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Title: Status of the NIF Project

Abstract

Ground was broken for the National Ignition Facility, a stadium-sized complex, in 1997. When complete, the project will contain a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt laser system adjoining a 10-meter-diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF's beams will compress and heat small capsules containing a mixture of hydrogen isotopes of deuterium and tritium. These targets will undergo nuclear fusion, producing more energy than the energy in the laser pulse and achieving scientific breakeven. NIF experiments will allow scientists to study physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million degrees Kelvin and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure--conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapon detonations.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
943814
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-230717
TRN: US0900460
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: JUNE ISSUE OF THE NEWSLETTER OF THE AMERICAN NUCLEAR SOCIETY-FUSION ENERGY DIVISION, N/A, N/A, June 1, 2007, pp. 7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; BREAKEVEN; DEUTERIUM; EXPLOSIONS; HYDROGEN ISOTOPES; LASERS; MIXTURES; TARGET CHAMBERS; TARGETS; TRITIUM; US NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

Citation Formats

Moses, E. Status of the NIF Project. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Moses, E. Status of the NIF Project. United States.
Moses, E. Mon . "Status of the NIF Project". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/943814.
@article{osti_943814,
title = {Status of the NIF Project},
author = {Moses, E},
abstractNote = {Ground was broken for the National Ignition Facility, a stadium-sized complex, in 1997. When complete, the project will contain a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt laser system adjoining a 10-meter-diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF's beams will compress and heat small capsules containing a mixture of hydrogen isotopes of deuterium and tritium. These targets will undergo nuclear fusion, producing more energy than the energy in the laser pulse and achieving scientific breakeven. NIF experiments will allow scientists to study physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million degrees Kelvin and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure--conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapon detonations.},
doi = {},
journal = {JUNE ISSUE OF THE NEWSLETTER OF THE AMERICAN NUCLEAR SOCIETY-FUSION ENERGY DIVISION, N/A, N/A, June 1, 2007, pp. 7},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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