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Title: Lessons Learned from the U.S. Photovoltaic Industry and Implications for Development of Distributed Small Wind

Abstract

In recent years, advocates for the solar photovoltaic (PV) industry have developed successful strategies for marketing PV as a customer-sited energy resource. Their efforts have ranged from supporting effective Federal programs and incentives to initiating state and local efforts to remove siting barriers and industry efforts that build consumer confidence. More important, PV advocates have established relationships that define customer-sited PV as a viable and important technology. The PV industry's record of success and its persistent challenges can be instructive to the small wind industry. These industries share many characteristics in terms of system outputs, applications, economics, and industry goals. In some ways, small wind is staged for growth just as PV was a decade ago. The authors provide an examination of market development issues in these industries, including Federal policy infrastructure and incentives, state and local policy infrastructure, and business support. Subsequently, the authors provide recommendations for distributed wind development that include collaborations with the PV industry and as stand-alone small wind initiatives. In particular, the authors suggest aligning customer-sited small wind (and PV) with demand-side energy strategies and emphasizing the need to address all customer-sited renewables under a cohesive distributed generation development strategy.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
943378
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: (Proceedings of) Windpower 2006 Conference and Exhibition (CD-ROM, Three-Track CD: Wind Potential, Utility, and Homes, Farms and Community Wind), 4-7 June 2006, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Related Information: For preprint version see NREL/CP-500-40172
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 17 WIND ENERGY; BUSINESS; ECONOMICS; FARMS; MARKET; MARKETING; RECOMMENDATIONS; Wind Energy

Citation Formats

Forsyth, T., Tombari, C., and Nelson, M. Lessons Learned from the U.S. Photovoltaic Industry and Implications for Development of Distributed Small Wind. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Forsyth, T., Tombari, C., & Nelson, M. Lessons Learned from the U.S. Photovoltaic Industry and Implications for Development of Distributed Small Wind. United States.
Forsyth, T., Tombari, C., and Nelson, M. Sun . "Lessons Learned from the U.S. Photovoltaic Industry and Implications for Development of Distributed Small Wind". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_943378,
title = {Lessons Learned from the U.S. Photovoltaic Industry and Implications for Development of Distributed Small Wind},
author = {Forsyth, T. and Tombari, C. and Nelson, M.},
abstractNote = {In recent years, advocates for the solar photovoltaic (PV) industry have developed successful strategies for marketing PV as a customer-sited energy resource. Their efforts have ranged from supporting effective Federal programs and incentives to initiating state and local efforts to remove siting barriers and industry efforts that build consumer confidence. More important, PV advocates have established relationships that define customer-sited PV as a viable and important technology. The PV industry's record of success and its persistent challenges can be instructive to the small wind industry. These industries share many characteristics in terms of system outputs, applications, economics, and industry goals. In some ways, small wind is staged for growth just as PV was a decade ago. The authors provide an examination of market development issues in these industries, including Federal policy infrastructure and incentives, state and local policy infrastructure, and business support. Subsequently, the authors provide recommendations for distributed wind development that include collaborations with the PV industry and as stand-alone small wind initiatives. In particular, the authors suggest aligning customer-sited small wind (and PV) with demand-side energy strategies and emphasizing the need to address all customer-sited renewables under a cohesive distributed generation development strategy.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • In recent years, advocates for the solar photovoltaic (PV) industry have developed successful strategies for marketing PV as a customer-sited energy resource. Their efforts have ranged from supporting effective Federal programs and incentives to initiating state and local efforts to remove siting barriers and industry efforts that build consumer confidence. More important, PV advocates have established relationships that define customer-sited PV as a viable and important technology. The PV industry's record of success and its persistent challenges can be instructive to the small wind industry. These industries share many characteristics in terms of system outputs, applications, economics, and industry goals.more » In some ways, small wind is staged for growth just as PV was a decade ago. The authors provide an examination of market development issues in these industries, including Federal policy infrastructure and incentives, state and local policy infrastructure, and business support. Subsequently, the authors provide recommendations for distributed wind development that include collaborations with the PV industry and as stand-alone small wind initiatives. In particular, the authors suggest aligning customer-sited small wind (and PV) with demand-side energy strategies and emphasizing the need to address all customer-sited renewables under a cohesive distributed generation development strategy.« less
  • Report examining market development issues in the solar photovoltaic (PV) industry, including Federal policy infrastructure and incentives, state and local policy infrastructure, and business support,as they relate to the small wind industry.
  • The telecommunications industry went through growing pains in the past that hold some interesting lessons for the growing distributed generation (DG) industry. The technology shifts and stakeholders involved with the historic market transformation of the telecommunications sector mirror similar factors involved in distributed generation today. An examination of these factors may inform best practices when approaching the conduits necessary to accelerate the shifting of our nation's energy system to cleaner forms of generation and use. From a technical perspective, the telecom industry in the 1990s saw a shift from highly centralized systems that had no capacity for adaptation to highlymore » adaptive, distributed network systems. From a management perspective, the industry shifted from small, private-company structures to big, capital-intensive corporations. This presentation will explore potential correlation and outline the lessons that we can take away from this comparison.« less