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Title: Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2

Abstract

In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&Dmore » program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No. DE-FC26-00NT40974). The report focuses on the major accomplishments and lessons learned in analyzing the risks of the novel UFP technology during Phase II of the DOE program.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
G E Energy & Environmental Research Corporation
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
943311
DOE Contract Number:  
FC26-00NT40974
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; AGGLOMERATION; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; CAPITALIZED COST; COAL; COMBINED CYCLES; COMBUSTION; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRICITY; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL CELLS; GAS TURBINES; GASIFICATION; IMPURITIES; LIFETIME; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; RISK ASSESSMENT; SOLID FUELS

Citation Formats

Kulkarni, Parag, Guan, Jie, Subia, Raul, Cui, Zhe, Manke, Jeff, Frydman, Arnaldo, Wei, Wei, Shisler, Roger, Ayala, Raul, McNulty, om, Rizeq, George, Zamansky, Vladimir, and Fletcher, Kelly. Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.2172/943311.
Kulkarni, Parag, Guan, Jie, Subia, Raul, Cui, Zhe, Manke, Jeff, Frydman, Arnaldo, Wei, Wei, Shisler, Roger, Ayala, Raul, McNulty, om, Rizeq, George, Zamansky, Vladimir, & Fletcher, Kelly. Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/943311
Kulkarni, Parag, Guan, Jie, Subia, Raul, Cui, Zhe, Manke, Jeff, Frydman, Arnaldo, Wei, Wei, Shisler, Roger, Ayala, Raul, McNulty, om, Rizeq, George, Zamansky, Vladimir, and Fletcher, Kelly. Mon . "Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/943311. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/943311.
@article{osti_943311,
title = {Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2},
author = {Kulkarni, Parag and Guan, Jie and Subia, Raul and Cui, Zhe and Manke, Jeff and Frydman, Arnaldo and Wei, Wei and Shisler, Roger and Ayala, Raul and McNulty, om and Rizeq, George and Zamansky, Vladimir and Fletcher, Kelly},
abstractNote = {In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No. DE-FC26-00NT40974). The report focuses on the major accomplishments and lessons learned in analyzing the risks of the novel UFP technology during Phase II of the DOE program.},
doi = {10.2172/943311},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/943311}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {3}
}