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Title: In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of ion-irradiated copper : temperature dependence of defect yield and cascade collapse.

Abstract

High-energy neutrons and ions incident upon a solid can initiate displacement collision cascades of lattice atoms which result in localized volumes within the solid that contain high concentrations of interstitial and vacancy point defects. At sufficiently high point-defect concentrations, cascade regions are unstable; recombination of interstitial and vacancy point defects can occur together with the aggregation of point defects into clusters. These clusters can collapse into various types of dislocation loop and stacking-fault tetrahedra which are large enough to produce lattice strain fields that are visible under diffraction-contrast imaging in a transmission electron microscope. The kinetics which drive cascade formation and subsequent collapse are investigated by analyzing the microstructure produced in situ by low-fluence 100keV Kr-ion irradiations of fcc Cu over a wide temperature range (18-873K). The product microstructures are characterized by quantitative measurements of the yields of collapsed point-defect clusters. In addition, their stabilities, lifetimes and size distributions are also examined. Defect yields are demonstrated unequivocally to be temperature dependent, remaining approximately constant up to lattice temperatures of 573K and then abruptly decreasing with increasing temperature. This drop in yield is not caused by defect loss during or following ion irradiation. It rather reflects a decrease in the probabilitymore » of cascade collapse which can be explained by a thermal spike effect.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
ER
OSTI Identifier:
942420
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/JA-31187
Journal ID: ISSN 0141-8610; PMAADG; TRN: US0902832
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Philos. Mag. A
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 80; Journal Issue: 4 ; Apr. 2000; Journal ID: ISSN 0141-8610
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ATOMS; COPPER; DEFECTS; DISLOCATIONS; ELECTRON MICROSCOPES; INTERSTITIALS; IONS; IRRADIATION; KINETICS; MICROSTRUCTURE; NEUTRONS; POINT DEFECTS; RECOMBINATION; SIZE; SOLIDS; STRAINS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE RANGE; THERMAL SPIKES; TRANSMISSION; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Daulton, T L, Kirk, M A, Rehn, L E, and Materials Science Division. In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of ion-irradiated copper : temperature dependence of defect yield and cascade collapse.. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1080/014186100250552.
Daulton, T L, Kirk, M A, Rehn, L E, & Materials Science Division. In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of ion-irradiated copper : temperature dependence of defect yield and cascade collapse.. United States. https://doi.org/10.1080/014186100250552
Daulton, T L, Kirk, M A, Rehn, L E, and Materials Science Division. 2000. "In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of ion-irradiated copper : temperature dependence of defect yield and cascade collapse.". United States. https://doi.org/10.1080/014186100250552.
@article{osti_942420,
title = {In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of ion-irradiated copper : temperature dependence of defect yield and cascade collapse.},
author = {Daulton, T L and Kirk, M A and Rehn, L E and Materials Science Division},
abstractNote = {High-energy neutrons and ions incident upon a solid can initiate displacement collision cascades of lattice atoms which result in localized volumes within the solid that contain high concentrations of interstitial and vacancy point defects. At sufficiently high point-defect concentrations, cascade regions are unstable; recombination of interstitial and vacancy point defects can occur together with the aggregation of point defects into clusters. These clusters can collapse into various types of dislocation loop and stacking-fault tetrahedra which are large enough to produce lattice strain fields that are visible under diffraction-contrast imaging in a transmission electron microscope. The kinetics which drive cascade formation and subsequent collapse are investigated by analyzing the microstructure produced in situ by low-fluence 100keV Kr-ion irradiations of fcc Cu over a wide temperature range (18-873K). The product microstructures are characterized by quantitative measurements of the yields of collapsed point-defect clusters. In addition, their stabilities, lifetimes and size distributions are also examined. Defect yields are demonstrated unequivocally to be temperature dependent, remaining approximately constant up to lattice temperatures of 573K and then abruptly decreasing with increasing temperature. This drop in yield is not caused by defect loss during or following ion irradiation. It rather reflects a decrease in the probability of cascade collapse which can be explained by a thermal spike effect.},
doi = {10.1080/014186100250552},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/942420}, journal = {Philos. Mag. A},
issn = {0141-8610},
number = 4 ; Apr. 2000,
volume = 80,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {4}
}