skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Polychromatic x-ray micro- and nanodiffraction for spatially-resolved structural studies.

Abstract

The availability of intense, focused synchrotron X-ray microbeams has enabled new techniques for materials investigations with sub-micron spatial resolution. The scanning microbeam setup we have developed at the XOR-UNI beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is versatile in that it provides 1D, 2D or 3D scans (including depth resolution), and can alternate between polychromatic- and monochromatic-beam modes. Focusing in both modes uses elliptical Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) reflecting mirrors. Beam diameters of {approx} 500 nm FWHM are now routine, and 90 nm focus has been demonstrated. In white-beam mode, a CCD detector records a complete Laue diffraction pattern, which is analyzed with an automated indexing program. These X-ray diffraction patterns provide real-space maps of the local lattice structure, crystal orientation, grain morphology, and strain tensor. Spatially-resolved X-ray microdiffraction studies are now providing previously unavailable measurements of local microstructures. These measurements, in turn, yield new insights in several classic fields of materials science. This paper will illustrate the application of polychromatic scanning X-ray microscopy with examples from 1D, 2D and 3D materials systems. In 1D systems, we have mapped the structure and orientation of an individual ZnO nanorod along with the associated Ge catalyst particle used to control the nanocrystal growth. Inmore » 2D systems, X-ray microdiffraction studies have revealed the mechanisms for local crystallographic tilting in epitaxial oxide films grown on textured Ni substrates for superconducting applications. In 3D systems, X-ray microscopy investigations have included in-situ studies of microstructural evolution during thermal grain growth in polycrystalline aluminum. In general, these spatially-resolved measurements provide important new insights and are valuable as input for theoretical and computer modeling studies of a wide range of material processes.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
941491
Report Number(s):
ANL/XSD/JA-62898
Journal ID: ISSN 0040-6090; THSFAP; TRN: US0807436
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Thin Solid Films
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 516; Journal Issue: 22 ; 2008; Journal ID: ISSN 0040-6090
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE; ALUMINIUM; CATALYSTS; COMPUTERS; DIFFRACTION; FOCUSING; GRAIN GROWTH; MICROSCOPY; MORPHOLOGY; ORIENTATION; OXIDES; RESOLUTION; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; STRAINS; SUBSTRATES; SYNCHROTRONS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Budai, J D, Liu, W, Tischler, J Z, Pan, Z W, Larson, B C, Yang, W, Norton, D P, Ice, G E, ORNL,, Univ. of Georgia, Univ.of Florida, and Carnegie Inst. of Washington. Polychromatic x-ray micro- and nanodiffraction for spatially-resolved structural studies.. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2008.04.045.
Budai, J D, Liu, W, Tischler, J Z, Pan, Z W, Larson, B C, Yang, W, Norton, D P, Ice, G E, ORNL,, Univ. of Georgia, Univ.of Florida, & Carnegie Inst. of Washington. Polychromatic x-ray micro- and nanodiffraction for spatially-resolved structural studies.. United States. doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2008.04.045.
Budai, J D, Liu, W, Tischler, J Z, Pan, Z W, Larson, B C, Yang, W, Norton, D P, Ice, G E, ORNL,, Univ. of Georgia, Univ.of Florida, and Carnegie Inst. of Washington. Tue . "Polychromatic x-ray micro- and nanodiffraction for spatially-resolved structural studies.". United States. doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2008.04.045.
@article{osti_941491,
title = {Polychromatic x-ray micro- and nanodiffraction for spatially-resolved structural studies.},
author = {Budai, J D and Liu, W and Tischler, J Z and Pan, Z W and Larson, B C and Yang, W and Norton, D P and Ice, G E and ORNL, and Univ. of Georgia and Univ.of Florida and Carnegie Inst. of Washington},
abstractNote = {The availability of intense, focused synchrotron X-ray microbeams has enabled new techniques for materials investigations with sub-micron spatial resolution. The scanning microbeam setup we have developed at the XOR-UNI beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is versatile in that it provides 1D, 2D or 3D scans (including depth resolution), and can alternate between polychromatic- and monochromatic-beam modes. Focusing in both modes uses elliptical Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) reflecting mirrors. Beam diameters of {approx} 500 nm FWHM are now routine, and 90 nm focus has been demonstrated. In white-beam mode, a CCD detector records a complete Laue diffraction pattern, which is analyzed with an automated indexing program. These X-ray diffraction patterns provide real-space maps of the local lattice structure, crystal orientation, grain morphology, and strain tensor. Spatially-resolved X-ray microdiffraction studies are now providing previously unavailable measurements of local microstructures. These measurements, in turn, yield new insights in several classic fields of materials science. This paper will illustrate the application of polychromatic scanning X-ray microscopy with examples from 1D, 2D and 3D materials systems. In 1D systems, we have mapped the structure and orientation of an individual ZnO nanorod along with the associated Ge catalyst particle used to control the nanocrystal growth. In 2D systems, X-ray microdiffraction studies have revealed the mechanisms for local crystallographic tilting in epitaxial oxide films grown on textured Ni substrates for superconducting applications. In 3D systems, X-ray microscopy investigations have included in-situ studies of microstructural evolution during thermal grain growth in polycrystalline aluminum. In general, these spatially-resolved measurements provide important new insights and are valuable as input for theoretical and computer modeling studies of a wide range of material processes.},
doi = {10.1016/j.tsf.2008.04.045},
journal = {Thin Solid Films},
issn = {0040-6090},
number = 22 ; 2008,
volume = 516,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {1}
}