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Title: The Use Of Scanning Probe Microscopy To Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces

Abstract

Over the past decade there has been a natural drive to extend the investigation of dynamic surfaces in fluid environments to higher resolution characterization tools. Various aspects of solution crystal growth have been directly visualized for the first time. These include island nucleation and growth using transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy; elemental step motion using scanning probe microscopy; and the time evolution of interfacial atomic structure using various diffraction techniques. In this lecture we will discuss the use of one such in situ method, scanning probe microscopy, as a means of measuring surface dynamics during crystal growth and dissolution. We will cover both practical aspects of imaging such as environmental control, fluid flow, and electrochemical manipulation, as well as the types of physical measurements that can be made. Measurements such as step motion, critical lengths, nucleation density, and step fluctuations, will be put in context of the information they provide about mechanistic processes at surfaces using examples from metal and mineral crystal growth.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
941395
Report Number(s):
UCRL-BOOK-230189
TRN: US0807443
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CRYSTAL GROWTH; DIFFRACTION; DISSOLUTION; FLUCTUATIONS; FLUID FLOW; ISLANDS; MICROSCOPY; NUCLEATION; PROBES; RESOLUTION; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Orme, C A, and Giocondi, J L. The Use Of Scanning Probe Microscopy To Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Orme, C A, & Giocondi, J L. The Use Of Scanning Probe Microscopy To Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces. United States.
Orme, C A, and Giocondi, J L. Mon . "The Use Of Scanning Probe Microscopy To Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/941395.
@article{osti_941395,
title = {The Use Of Scanning Probe Microscopy To Investigate Crystal-Fluid Interfaces},
author = {Orme, C A and Giocondi, J L},
abstractNote = {Over the past decade there has been a natural drive to extend the investigation of dynamic surfaces in fluid environments to higher resolution characterization tools. Various aspects of solution crystal growth have been directly visualized for the first time. These include island nucleation and growth using transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy; elemental step motion using scanning probe microscopy; and the time evolution of interfacial atomic structure using various diffraction techniques. In this lecture we will discuss the use of one such in situ method, scanning probe microscopy, as a means of measuring surface dynamics during crystal growth and dissolution. We will cover both practical aspects of imaging such as environmental control, fluid flow, and electrochemical manipulation, as well as the types of physical measurements that can be made. Measurements such as step motion, critical lengths, nucleation density, and step fluctuations, will be put in context of the information they provide about mechanistic processes at surfaces using examples from metal and mineral crystal growth.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 16 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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