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Title: Rare Isotope Accelerator - Conceptual Design of Target Areas

Abstract

The planned rare isotope accelerator facility RIA in the US would become the most powerful radioactive beam facility in the world. RIA s driver accelerator will be a device capable of providing beams from protons to uranium at energies of at least 400MeV per nucleon, with beam power up to 400 kW. Radioactive beam production relies on both the in-flight separation of fast beam fragments and on the ISOL technique. In both cases the high beam power poses major challenges for target technology and handling and on the design of the beam production areas. This paper will give a brief overview of RIA and discuss aspects of ongoing conceptual design work for the RIA target areas.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3] more »;  [5];  [5];  [5];  [5];  [6] « less
  1. Michigan State University, East Lansing
  2. CEA, Saclay, France
  3. ORNL
  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)
  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)
  6. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
940347
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 7th International Conference on Accelerator Applications - AccApp05, Venice, Italy, 20050829, 20050901
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; BEAM PRODUCTION; DESIGN; PROTONS; TARGETS; URANIUM; radioactive beam production; high-power targets; radiation transport

Citation Formats

Bollen, Georg, Baek, Inseok, Blideanu, Valentin, Lawton, Don, Mantica, Paul F., Morrissey, David J., Ronningen, Reginald M., Sherrill, Bradley S., Zeller, Albert, Beene, James R, Burgess, Tom, Carter, Kenneth, Carrol, Adam, Conner, David, Gabriel, Tony A, Mansur, Louis K, Remec, Igor, Rennich, Mark J, Stracener, Daniel W, Wendel, Mark W, Ahle, Larry, Boles, Jason, Reyes, Susana, Stein, Werner, and Heilbronn, Lawrence. Rare Isotope Accelerator - Conceptual Design of Target Areas. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Bollen, Georg, Baek, Inseok, Blideanu, Valentin, Lawton, Don, Mantica, Paul F., Morrissey, David J., Ronningen, Reginald M., Sherrill, Bradley S., Zeller, Albert, Beene, James R, Burgess, Tom, Carter, Kenneth, Carrol, Adam, Conner, David, Gabriel, Tony A, Mansur, Louis K, Remec, Igor, Rennich, Mark J, Stracener, Daniel W, Wendel, Mark W, Ahle, Larry, Boles, Jason, Reyes, Susana, Stein, Werner, & Heilbronn, Lawrence. Rare Isotope Accelerator - Conceptual Design of Target Areas. United States.
Bollen, Georg, Baek, Inseok, Blideanu, Valentin, Lawton, Don, Mantica, Paul F., Morrissey, David J., Ronningen, Reginald M., Sherrill, Bradley S., Zeller, Albert, Beene, James R, Burgess, Tom, Carter, Kenneth, Carrol, Adam, Conner, David, Gabriel, Tony A, Mansur, Louis K, Remec, Igor, Rennich, Mark J, Stracener, Daniel W, Wendel, Mark W, Ahle, Larry, Boles, Jason, Reyes, Susana, Stein, Werner, and Heilbronn, Lawrence. Sun . "Rare Isotope Accelerator - Conceptual Design of Target Areas". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_940347,
title = {Rare Isotope Accelerator - Conceptual Design of Target Areas},
author = {Bollen, Georg and Baek, Inseok and Blideanu, Valentin and Lawton, Don and Mantica, Paul F. and Morrissey, David J. and Ronningen, Reginald M. and Sherrill, Bradley S. and Zeller, Albert and Beene, James R and Burgess, Tom and Carter, Kenneth and Carrol, Adam and Conner, David and Gabriel, Tony A and Mansur, Louis K and Remec, Igor and Rennich, Mark J and Stracener, Daniel W and Wendel, Mark W and Ahle, Larry and Boles, Jason and Reyes, Susana and Stein, Werner and Heilbronn, Lawrence},
abstractNote = {The planned rare isotope accelerator facility RIA in the US would become the most powerful radioactive beam facility in the world. RIA s driver accelerator will be a device capable of providing beams from protons to uranium at energies of at least 400MeV per nucleon, with beam power up to 400 kW. Radioactive beam production relies on both the in-flight separation of fast beam fragments and on the ISOL technique. In both cases the high beam power poses major challenges for target technology and handling and on the design of the beam production areas. This paper will give a brief overview of RIA and discuss aspects of ongoing conceptual design work for the RIA target areas.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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