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Title: System Cost Analysis for an Interior Permanent Magnet Motor

Abstract

The objective of this program is to provide an assessment of the cost structure for an interior permanent magnet ('IPM') motor which is designed to meet the 2010 FreedomCAR specification. The program is to evaluate the range of viable permanent magnet materials for an IPM motor, including sintered and bonded grades of rare earth magnets. The study considers the benefits of key processing steps, alternative magnet shapes and their assembly methods into the rotor (including magnetization), and any mechanical stress or temperature limits. The motor's costs are estimated for an annual production quantity of 200,000 units, and are broken out into such major components as magnetic raw materials, processing and manufacturing. But this is essentially a feasibility study of the motor's electromagnetic design, and is not intended to include mechanical or thermal studies as would be done to work up a selected design for production.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
940187
Report Number(s):
IS-5191
TRN: US200823%%703
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-07CH11358
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; DESIGN; MOTORS; PERMANENT MAGNETS; ELECTRIC-POWERED VEHICLES; COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS; FEASIBILITY STUDIES

Citation Formats

Peter Campbell. System Cost Analysis for an Interior Permanent Magnet Motor. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.2172/940187.
Peter Campbell. System Cost Analysis for an Interior Permanent Magnet Motor. United States. doi:10.2172/940187.
Peter Campbell. 2008. "System Cost Analysis for an Interior Permanent Magnet Motor". United States. doi:10.2172/940187. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/940187.
@article{osti_940187,
title = {System Cost Analysis for an Interior Permanent Magnet Motor},
author = {Peter Campbell},
abstractNote = {The objective of this program is to provide an assessment of the cost structure for an interior permanent magnet ('IPM') motor which is designed to meet the 2010 FreedomCAR specification. The program is to evaluate the range of viable permanent magnet materials for an IPM motor, including sintered and bonded grades of rare earth magnets. The study considers the benefits of key processing steps, alternative magnet shapes and their assembly methods into the rotor (including magnetization), and any mechanical stress or temperature limits. The motor's costs are estimated for an annual production quantity of 200,000 units, and are broken out into such major components as magnetic raw materials, processing and manufacturing. But this is essentially a feasibility study of the motor's electromagnetic design, and is not intended to include mechanical or thermal studies as would be done to work up a selected design for production.},
doi = {10.2172/940187},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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