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Title: SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

Abstract

This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among largemore » groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large portion of national program efforts are organized around coordinated efforts to develop promising operational scenarios. Substantial efforts to develop integrated plasma modeling codes are also underway in the U.S., Europe and Japan. As a result of the highly collaborative nature of FES research, the community is facing new and unique challenges. While FES has a significant track record for developing and exploiting remote collaborations, with such large investments at stake, there is a clear need to improve the integration and reach of available tools. The NFC Project was initiated to address these challenges by creating and deploying collaborative software tools. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES 'Grid' (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Trustees of Princeton University; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory; Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
940184
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER25456
TRN: US1001288
DOE Contract Number:  
FC02-01ER25456
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ANL; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERS; ENERGY SYSTEMS; EXPERIMENTAL REACTORS; INTERNET; PHYSICS; PLASMA; SECURITY; SIMULATION; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS

Citation Formats

SCHISSEL, D P, ABLA, G, BURRUSS, J R, FEIBUSH, E, FREDIAN, T W, GOODE, M M, GREENWALD, M J, KEAHEY, K, LEGGETT, T, LI, K, McCUNE, D C, PAPKA, M E, RANDERSON, L, SANDERSON, A, STILLERMAN, J, THOMPSON, M R, URAM, T, and WALLACE, G. SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/940184.
SCHISSEL, D P, ABLA, G, BURRUSS, J R, FEIBUSH, E, FREDIAN, T W, GOODE, M M, GREENWALD, M J, KEAHEY, K, LEGGETT, T, LI, K, McCUNE, D C, PAPKA, M E, RANDERSON, L, SANDERSON, A, STILLERMAN, J, THOMPSON, M R, URAM, T, & WALLACE, G. SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/940184
SCHISSEL, D P, ABLA, G, BURRUSS, J R, FEIBUSH, E, FREDIAN, T W, GOODE, M M, GREENWALD, M J, KEAHEY, K, LEGGETT, T, LI, K, McCUNE, D C, PAPKA, M E, RANDERSON, L, SANDERSON, A, STILLERMAN, J, THOMPSON, M R, URAM, T, and WALLACE, G. Thu . "SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/940184. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/940184.
@article{osti_940184,
title = {SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion},
author = {SCHISSEL, D P and ABLA, G and BURRUSS, J R and FEIBUSH, E and FREDIAN, T W and GOODE, M M and GREENWALD, M J and KEAHEY, K and LEGGETT, T and LI, K and McCUNE, D C and PAPKA, M E and RANDERSON, L and SANDERSON, A and STILLERMAN, J and THOMPSON, M R and URAM, T and WALLACE, G},
abstractNote = {This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large portion of national program efforts are organized around coordinated efforts to develop promising operational scenarios. Substantial efforts to develop integrated plasma modeling codes are also underway in the U.S., Europe and Japan. As a result of the highly collaborative nature of FES research, the community is facing new and unique challenges. While FES has a significant track record for developing and exploiting remote collaborations, with such large investments at stake, there is a clear need to improve the integration and reach of available tools. The NFC Project was initiated to address these challenges by creating and deploying collaborative software tools. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES 'Grid' (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.},
doi = {10.2172/940184},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/940184}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {8}
}