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Title: Thermal Conductivity of Porous Silicon Carbide Derived from Wood Precursors

Abstract

Biomorphic silicon carbide (bioSiC), a novel porous ceramic derived from natural wood precursors, has potential applicability at high temperatures, particularly when rapid temperature changes occur. The thermal conductivity of bioSiC from five different precursors was experimentally determined using flash diffusivity and specific heat measurements at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1100 C. The results were compared with values obtained from object-oriented finite-element analysis (OOF). OOF was also used to model and understand the heat-flow paths through the complex bioSiC microstructures.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. Northwestern University, Evanston
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); High Temperature Materials Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
938735
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the American Ceramic Society; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; CERAMICS; HEAT FLUX; SILICON CARBIDES; SPECIFIC HEAT; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; WOOD

Citation Formats

Pappacena, Kristen E, Wang, Hsin, Porter, Wallace D, and Faber, K. T. Thermal Conductivity of Porous Silicon Carbide Derived from Wood Precursors. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1551-2916.2007.01777.x.
Pappacena, Kristen E, Wang, Hsin, Porter, Wallace D, & Faber, K. T. Thermal Conductivity of Porous Silicon Carbide Derived from Wood Precursors. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1551-2916.2007.01777.x.
Pappacena, Kristen E, Wang, Hsin, Porter, Wallace D, and Faber, K. T. Mon . "Thermal Conductivity of Porous Silicon Carbide Derived from Wood Precursors". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1551-2916.2007.01777.x.
@article{osti_938735,
title = {Thermal Conductivity of Porous Silicon Carbide Derived from Wood Precursors},
author = {Pappacena, Kristen E and Wang, Hsin and Porter, Wallace D and Faber, K. T.},
abstractNote = {Biomorphic silicon carbide (bioSiC), a novel porous ceramic derived from natural wood precursors, has potential applicability at high temperatures, particularly when rapid temperature changes occur. The thermal conductivity of bioSiC from five different precursors was experimentally determined using flash diffusivity and specific heat measurements at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1100 C. The results were compared with values obtained from object-oriented finite-element analysis (OOF). OOF was also used to model and understand the heat-flow paths through the complex bioSiC microstructures.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1551-2916.2007.01777.x},
journal = {Journal of the American Ceramic Society},
number = 9,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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