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Title: Underground Mine Water Heating and Cooling Using Geothermal Heat Pump Systems

Abstract

In many regions of the world, flooded mines are a potentially cost-effective option for heating and cooling using geothermal heat pump systems. For example, a single coal seam in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio contains 5.1 x 1012 L of water. The growing volume of water discharging from this one coal seam totals 380,000 L/min, which could theoretically heat and cool 20,000 homes. Using the water stored in the mines would conservatively extend this option to an order of magnitude more sites. Based on current energy prices, geothermal heat pump systems using mine water could reduce annual costs for heating by 67% and cooling by 50% over conventional methods (natural gas or heating oil and standard air conditioning).

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, Morgantown, WV, and Albany, OR
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
938589
Report Number(s):
DOE/NETL-IR-2006-189; NETL-TPR-1542
Journal ID: ISSN 1025-9112; eISSN 1616-1068; TRN: US200820%%172
DOE Contract Number:
None cited
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Mine Water and the Environment; Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 02 PETROLEUM; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; AIR; COAL SEAMS; HEAT PUMPS; HEATING; HEATING OILS; PRICES; WATER; WATER HEATING; CHEMISORPTION; PENTACENE; SILICON; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; MORPHOLOGY; ADSORPTION HEAT; geothermal; heat pump; mine water; Pittsburgh coal seam

Citation Formats

Watzlaf, G.R., and Ackman, T.E. Underground Mine Water Heating and Cooling Using Geothermal Heat Pump Systems. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1007/s10230-006-0103-9.
Watzlaf, G.R., & Ackman, T.E. Underground Mine Water Heating and Cooling Using Geothermal Heat Pump Systems. United States. doi:10.1007/s10230-006-0103-9.
Watzlaf, G.R., and Ackman, T.E. Wed . "Underground Mine Water Heating and Cooling Using Geothermal Heat Pump Systems". United States. doi:10.1007/s10230-006-0103-9.
@article{osti_938589,
title = {Underground Mine Water Heating and Cooling Using Geothermal Heat Pump Systems},
author = {Watzlaf, G.R. and Ackman, T.E.},
abstractNote = {In many regions of the world, flooded mines are a potentially cost-effective option for heating and cooling using geothermal heat pump systems. For example, a single coal seam in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio contains 5.1 x 1012 L of water. The growing volume of water discharging from this one coal seam totals 380,000 L/min, which could theoretically heat and cool 20,000 homes. Using the water stored in the mines would conservatively extend this option to an order of magnitude more sites. Based on current energy prices, geothermal heat pump systems using mine water could reduce annual costs for heating by 67% and cooling by 50% over conventional methods (natural gas or heating oil and standard air conditioning).},
doi = {10.1007/s10230-006-0103-9},
journal = {Mine Water and the Environment},
number = 1,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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