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Title: The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

Abstract

Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided themore » first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of specific tfb genes and the regulation of nitrogen metabolism and other global cellular responses.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
937513
Report Number(s):
DE-FG02-91ER20041-5
TRN: US201002%%334
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-91ER20041
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; GENES; GENETICS; IN VIVO; METABOLISM; MUTANTS; NITROGEN; PROMOTERS; PROTEINS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; RNA POLYMERASES; STRAINS; TRANSCRIPTION; TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

Citation Formats

Charles J. Daniels. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.2172/937513.
Charles J. Daniels. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression. United States. doi:10.2172/937513.
Charles J. Daniels. Tue . "The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression". United States. doi:10.2172/937513. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/937513.
@article{osti_937513,
title = {The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression},
author = {Charles J. Daniels},
abstractNote = {Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of specific tfb genes and the regulation of nitrogen metabolism and other global cellular responses.},
doi = {10.2172/937513},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 23 00:00:00 EDT 2008},
month = {Tue Sep 23 00:00:00 EDT 2008}
}

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