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Title: Nanopumping using carbon nanotubes.

Abstract

A new 'nanopumping' effect consisting of the activation of an axial gas flow inside a carbon nanotube by producing Rayleigh traveling waves on the nanotube surface is predicted. The driving force for the new effect is the friction between the gas particles and the nanotube walls. A molecular dynamics simulation of the new effect was carried out showing macroscopic flows of atomic and molecular hydrogen and helium gases in a carbon nanotube.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
937421
Report Number(s):
ANL/MCS/JA-62565
TRN: US200819%%117
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nano Lett.; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 9 ; 2006
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; CARBON; FRICTION; GAS FLOW; GASES; HELIUM; HYDROGEN; NANOTUBES; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Insepov, Z., Wolf, D., Hassanein, A., Mathematics and Computer Science, and INL. Nanopumping using carbon nanotubes.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1021/nl060932m.
Insepov, Z., Wolf, D., Hassanein, A., Mathematics and Computer Science, & INL. Nanopumping using carbon nanotubes.. United States. doi:10.1021/nl060932m.
Insepov, Z., Wolf, D., Hassanein, A., Mathematics and Computer Science, and INL. Sun . "Nanopumping using carbon nanotubes.". United States. doi:10.1021/nl060932m.
@article{osti_937421,
title = {Nanopumping using carbon nanotubes.},
author = {Insepov, Z. and Wolf, D. and Hassanein, A. and Mathematics and Computer Science and INL},
abstractNote = {A new 'nanopumping' effect consisting of the activation of an axial gas flow inside a carbon nanotube by producing Rayleigh traveling waves on the nanotube surface is predicted. The driving force for the new effect is the friction between the gas particles and the nanotube walls. A molecular dynamics simulation of the new effect was carried out showing macroscopic flows of atomic and molecular hydrogen and helium gases in a carbon nanotube.},
doi = {10.1021/nl060932m},
journal = {Nano Lett.},
number = 9 ; 2006,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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