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Title: Biological impacts and context of network theory

Abstract

Many complex systems can be represented and analyzed as networks, and examples that have benefited from this approach span the natural sciences. For instance, we now know that systems as disparate as the World-Wide Web, the Internet, scientific collaborations, food webs, protein interactions and metabolism all have common features in their organization, the most salient of which are their scale-free connectivity distributions and their small-world behavior. The recent availability of large scale datasets that span the proteome or metabolome of an organism have made it possible to elucidate some of the organizational principles and rules that govern their function, robustness and evolution. We expect that combining the currently separate layers of information from gene regulatory-, signal transduction-, protein interaction- and metabolic networks will dramatically enhance our understanding of cellular function and dynamics.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
936985
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-227407
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-0949; JEBIAM; TRN: US200821%%185
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 210, N/A, April 20, 2007, pp. 1548-1558; Journal Volume: 210
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; AVAILABILITY; FOOD; GENES; INTERNET; METABOLISM; PROTEINS

Citation Formats

Almaas, E. Biological impacts and context of network theory. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1242/jeb.003731.
Almaas, E. Biological impacts and context of network theory. United States. doi:10.1242/jeb.003731.
Almaas, E. Fri . "Biological impacts and context of network theory". United States. doi:10.1242/jeb.003731. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/936985.
@article{osti_936985,
title = {Biological impacts and context of network theory},
author = {Almaas, E},
abstractNote = {Many complex systems can be represented and analyzed as networks, and examples that have benefited from this approach span the natural sciences. For instance, we now know that systems as disparate as the World-Wide Web, the Internet, scientific collaborations, food webs, protein interactions and metabolism all have common features in their organization, the most salient of which are their scale-free connectivity distributions and their small-world behavior. The recent availability of large scale datasets that span the proteome or metabolome of an organism have made it possible to elucidate some of the organizational principles and rules that govern their function, robustness and evolution. We expect that combining the currently separate layers of information from gene regulatory-, signal transduction-, protein interaction- and metabolic networks will dramatically enhance our understanding of cellular function and dynamics.},
doi = {10.1242/jeb.003731},
journal = {Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 210, N/A, April 20, 2007, pp. 1548-1558},
number = ,
volume = 210,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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