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Title: Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.

Abstract

The U.S. Army has a need for continuous, accurate estimates of the wet bulb globe temperature to protect soldiers and civilian workers from heat-related injuries, including those involved in the storage and destruction of aging chemical munitions at depots across the United States. At these depots, workers must don protective clothing that increases their risk of heat-related injury. Because of the difficulty in making continuous, accurate measurements of wet bulb globe temperature outdoors, the authors have developed a model of the wet bulb globe temperature that relies only on standard meteorological data available at each storage depot for input. The model is composed of separate submodels of the natural wet bulb and globe temperatures that are based on fundamental principles of heat and mass transfer, has no site-dependent parameters, and achieves an accuracy of better than 1 C based on comparisons with wet bulb globe temperature measurements at all depots.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Army Chemical Materials Agency
OSTI Identifier:
936511
Report Number(s):
ANL/DIS/JA-60735
TRN: US200818%%747
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: JOEH; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: Oct. 2008
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; THERMOMETERS; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; MILITARY PERSONNEL; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; AMMUNITION; STORAGE; DECOMPOSITION

Citation Formats

Liljegren, J. C., Carhart, R. A., Lawday, P., Tschopp, S., Sharp, R., and Decision and Information Sciences. Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1080/15459620802310770.
Liljegren, J. C., Carhart, R. A., Lawday, P., Tschopp, S., Sharp, R., & Decision and Information Sciences. Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.. United States. doi:10.1080/15459620802310770.
Liljegren, J. C., Carhart, R. A., Lawday, P., Tschopp, S., Sharp, R., and Decision and Information Sciences. 2008. "Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.". United States. doi:10.1080/15459620802310770.
@article{osti_936511,
title = {Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.},
author = {Liljegren, J. C. and Carhart, R. A. and Lawday, P. and Tschopp, S. and Sharp, R. and Decision and Information Sciences},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Army has a need for continuous, accurate estimates of the wet bulb globe temperature to protect soldiers and civilian workers from heat-related injuries, including those involved in the storage and destruction of aging chemical munitions at depots across the United States. At these depots, workers must don protective clothing that increases their risk of heat-related injury. Because of the difficulty in making continuous, accurate measurements of wet bulb globe temperature outdoors, the authors have developed a model of the wet bulb globe temperature that relies only on standard meteorological data available at each storage depot for input. The model is composed of separate submodels of the natural wet bulb and globe temperatures that are based on fundamental principles of heat and mass transfer, has no site-dependent parameters, and achieves an accuracy of better than 1 C based on comparisons with wet bulb globe temperature measurements at all depots.},
doi = {10.1080/15459620802310770},
journal = {JOEH},
number = Oct. 2008,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month =
}
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