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Title: Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next-Generation Instrumentation and Beyond. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electron Scattering for Materials Characterization, March 1-2, 2007

Abstract

To identify emerging basic science and engineering research needs and opportunities that will require major advances in electron-scattering theory, technology, and instrumentation.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOESC (USDOE Office of Science (SC))
Sponsoring Org.:
US DOE - Office of Basic Energy Sciences
OSTI Identifier:
935556
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; ELECTRON DIFFRACTION; DIFFRACTOMETERS; INFORMATION NEEDS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Miller, D. J., Williams, D. B., Anderson, I. M., Schmid, A. K., and Zaluzec, N. J. Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next-Generation Instrumentation and Beyond. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electron Scattering for Materials Characterization, March 1-2, 2007. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/935556.
Miller, D. J., Williams, D. B., Anderson, I. M., Schmid, A. K., & Zaluzec, N. J. Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next-Generation Instrumentation and Beyond. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electron Scattering for Materials Characterization, March 1-2, 2007. United States. doi:10.2172/935556.
Miller, D. J., Williams, D. B., Anderson, I. M., Schmid, A. K., and Zaluzec, N. J. Fri . "Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next-Generation Instrumentation and Beyond. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electron Scattering for Materials Characterization, March 1-2, 2007". United States. doi:10.2172/935556. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/935556.
@article{osti_935556,
title = {Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next-Generation Instrumentation and Beyond. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electron Scattering for Materials Characterization, March 1-2, 2007},
author = {Miller, D. J. and Williams, D. B. and Anderson, I. M. and Schmid, A. K. and Zaluzec, N. J.},
abstractNote = {To identify emerging basic science and engineering research needs and opportunities that will require major advances in electron-scattering theory, technology, and instrumentation.},
doi = {10.2172/935556},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 02 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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