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Title: Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide

Abstract

Well blowout rates in oil fields undergoing thermally enhanced recovery (via steam injection) in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005 were on the order of 1 per 1,000 well construction operations, 1 per 10,000 active wells per year, and 1 per 100,000 shut-in/idle and plugged/abandoned wells per year. This allows some initial inferences about leakage of CO2 via wells, which is considered perhaps the greatest leakage risk for geological storage of CO2. During the study period, 9% of the oil produced in the United States was from District 4, and 59% of this production was via thermally enhanced recovery. There was only one possible blowout from an unknown or poorly located well, despite over a century of well drilling and production activities in the district. The blowout rate declined dramatically during the study period, most likely as a result of increasing experience, improved technology, and/or changes in safety culture. If so, this decline indicates the blowout rate in CO2-storage fields can be significantly minimized both initially and with increasing experience over time. Comparable studies should be conducted in other areas. These studies would be particularly valuable in regions with CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and natural gasmore » storage.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Earth Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
935414
Report Number(s):
LBNL-745E
TRN: US200815%%709
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Geology
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54; 58; BLOWOUTS; CALIFORNIA; CARBON DIOXIDE; CONSTRUCTION; ENHANCED RECOVERY; NATURAL GAS; OIL FIELDS; PRODUCTION; SAFETY CULTURE; STEAM INJECTION; STORAGE; WELL DRILLING

Citation Formats

Jordan, Preston, Jordan, Preston D., and Benson, Sally M. Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1007/s00254-008-1403-0.
Jordan, Preston, Jordan, Preston D., & Benson, Sally M. Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide. United States. doi:10.1007/s00254-008-1403-0.
Jordan, Preston, Jordan, Preston D., and Benson, Sally M. Thu . "Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide". United States. doi:10.1007/s00254-008-1403-0. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/935414.
@article{osti_935414,
title = {Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide},
author = {Jordan, Preston and Jordan, Preston D. and Benson, Sally M.},
abstractNote = {Well blowout rates in oil fields undergoing thermally enhanced recovery (via steam injection) in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005 were on the order of 1 per 1,000 well construction operations, 1 per 10,000 active wells per year, and 1 per 100,000 shut-in/idle and plugged/abandoned wells per year. This allows some initial inferences about leakage of CO2 via wells, which is considered perhaps the greatest leakage risk for geological storage of CO2. During the study period, 9% of the oil produced in the United States was from District 4, and 59% of this production was via thermally enhanced recovery. There was only one possible blowout from an unknown or poorly located well, despite over a century of well drilling and production activities in the district. The blowout rate declined dramatically during the study period, most likely as a result of increasing experience, improved technology, and/or changes in safety culture. If so, this decline indicates the blowout rate in CO2-storage fields can be significantly minimized both initially and with increasing experience over time. Comparable studies should be conducted in other areas. These studies would be particularly valuable in regions with CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage.},
doi = {10.1007/s00254-008-1403-0},
journal = {Environmental Geology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2008},
month = {Thu May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2008}
}